Scrapper offensive lineman named Rotary Club MVP

ROTARY MVP. Scrapper senior Cameron Alexander (third from left) was named Most Valuable Player on the 2013 football team Saturday night at the Rotary Club Football Banquet. Rotary president Margi Jenks (left) invited Alexander’s mother, Tammy Alexander (second from left), and his father, Jeff Alexander, on stage for the presentation

By John R. Schirmer
Leader staff
Senior offensive lineman Cameron Alexander was named the Nashville Scrappers’ Most Valuable Player Saturday night at the conclusion of the 54th annual Rotary Club Football Banquet.
A three-year starter, Alexander was a Permanent Team Captain, All-District and All-State selection and will play in the Arkansas All-Star game this summer in Conway.
Rotary president Margi Jenks presented the MVP award to Alexander and invited his mother, Tammy Alexander, and his father, Jeff Alexander, to join the honoree on stage at the Nashville Elementary School cafeteria.
“What is an MVP?” Jenks said she asked as she prepared for Saturday’s banquet.
“I asked the coaches. They said somebody who is always in the weight room. Someone with high academic standards, a 4.0 GPA for Cameron. Someone who is loyal. Competitive. Selfless. All about the team and doing what’s best for the team.
“Then I asked his mom. She said Cameron has always wanted to be a Scrapper from the time when the high school players visited kids at elementary and primary. He’s worked to better himself. He gets up every morning at 5:30 and works out at the Gym in Nashville before school and after basketball practice. His ultimate dream is to be a football coach himself,” Jenks said in giving Tammy Alexander’s description of her son. “He loves his teammates and friends. He’s a good role model. He’s a Christian. He’s dependable and doesn’t take it easy. He’s loving, funny, sometimes a pain, but I love him dearly.”
Last, Jenks turned to the MVP honoree himself in the form of an essay which he wrote for David Schwope’s Advanced Composition class at NHS. In the essay, Alexander told what it meant to him to be a Scrapper.
“My high school career is over,” he said in the essay. “I’ll never forget going on the field on Friday night. There’s no better feeling. It’s a real blessing what God has opened for me. I had a great relationship with my coaches going back to seventh grade. They got on me on the field, but it was their way of showing they loved me. I’m thankful for everything. As they say in Nashville, ‘Once a Scrapper, Always a Scrapper.’”
The MVP presentation was the climax of a night of accolades for the Scrappers. Position coaches presented a number of awards to their players, including the following:
Outstanding Defensive LIneman – Coach Jerry Baker presented the award to LT Muldrow. “He made my job easy. He led our defensive front and taught our younger kids to work and showed the value of dedication to the game. He’s a special young man and made a big impact on my life,” Baker said. Muldrow had 76 tackles, 6 tackles for a loss and 13 hurries.
Outstanding Offensive LIneman – Coach D.J. Graham presented the award to Cameron Alexander. “He had 65 big blocks, 30 STAR plays, a 93 percent grading average,” Graham said. “He anchored our O-line. He worked himself into the best lineman in the conference. He will develop into the best on his college team,” Graham said. Alexander is a two-time Outstanding Lineman of the Year for the Scrappers and was Lineman of the Year in District 7-4A.
Outstanding Receiver -  Coach Paul Ernest presented the award to LaMichael Pettway. For the season, Pettway had 56 receptions for 1,058 yards, 15 touchdown receptions and 2 rushing touchdowns.
Outstanding Defensive Back – Coach Brian Bearden presented the award to Leonard Snell, who recently was named to the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette’s Super Sophomore team.
Outstanding Defensive Linebacker – Coach Brian “Boomer” Brown presented the award to Ashton Walker, whose first extensive action came against Watson Chapel, where he played before transferring to Nashville. Walker had 71 tackles and 3 TFLs. “He’s one of the most coachable athletes I’ve seen,” Brown said.
Outstanding Running Back – Coach Billy Dawson presented the award to Kyler Lawrence. The senior “had a great career here,” Dawson said, and played on offense and defense. He had 1,055 yards receiving and running, 15 touchdowns, 39 tackles and 4 break-ups.
Outstanding Special Teams – Coach Jerry Baker said the recipient was Christian Aranda, who was unable to attend the banquet. Aranda, the Scrapper kicker, made 41 of 45 PATs and 2 of 2 field goals for a total of 47 points.
Champion Awards Defense – Recipients were David Galvan and Charles Furr.
Champion Awards Offense – Recipients were Lee Scroggins and Curtis Myers.
All-District – Coach Billy Dawson introduced All-District selections, including first team Cameron Alexander, LT Muldrow, Tyler Parker and LaMichael Pettway; second team Braden Hood, Leonard Snell, Billy Stewart and Kyler Lawrence; honorable mention Asher Walker, Kory Snodgrass, Ashton Walker, Storm Nichols and Lucas Liggin.
All-State – Cameron Alexander, LaMichael Pettway.
All-Star – Cameron Alexander. He was named the Outstanding Lineman in District 7-4A and will play in the Arkansas All-Star game June 27 at the University of Central Arkansas.
Permanent Team Captains – Cameron Alexander, Eric Perez and LT Muldrow. “They were selected by their peers,” Dawson said. “I told the players that they were voting for strong work ethic, someone who stands up for what’s right, someone that 10 years from now, you’ll still be proud of them. You know, the players get it right every year. They’re always watching. Our choices this year are three unbelievable human beings. Ten years from now, they’ll be owning companies, preaching, coaching, doing something to make us proud. They’ll carry the Scrapper Star with them everywhere.”

 

ROTARY MVP. Scrapper senior Cameron Alexander (third from left) was named Most Valuable Player on the 2013 football team Saturday night at the Rotary Club Football Banquet. Rotary president Margi Jenks (left) invited Alexander’s mother, Tammy Alexander (second from left), and his father, Jeff Alexander, on stage for the presentation. See The Nashville Leader's Facebook page for more pictures from the banquet.

By John R. Schirmer
Leader staff
Senior offensive lineman Cameron Alexander was named the Nashville Scrappers’ Most Valuable Player Saturday night at the conclusion of the 54th annual Rotary Club Football Banquet.
A three-year starter, Alexander was a Permanent Team Captain, All-District and All-State selection and will play in the Arkansas All-Star game this summer in Conway.
Rotary president Margi Jenks presented the MVP award to Alexander and invited his mother, Tammy Alexander, and his father, Jeff Alexander, to join the honoree on stage at the Nashville Elementary School cafeteria.
“What is an MVP?” Jenks said she asked as she prepared for Saturday’s banquet.
“I asked the coaches. They said somebody who is always in the weight room. Someone with high academic standards, a 4.0 GPA for Cameron. Someone who is loyal. Competitive. Selfless. All about the team and doing what’s best for the team.
“Then I asked his mom. She said Cameron has always wanted to be a Scrapper from the time when the high school players visited kids at elementary and primary. He’s worked to better himself. He gets up every morning at 5:30 and works out at the Gym in Nashville before school and after basketball practice. His ultimate dream is to be a football coach himself,” Jenks said in giving Tammy Alexander’s description of her son. “He loves his teammates and friends. He’s a good role model. He’s a Christian. He’s dependable and doesn’t take it easy. He’s loving, funny, sometimes a pain, but I love him dearly.”
Last, Jenks turned to the MVP honoree himself in the form of an essay which he wrote for David Schwope’s Advanced Composition class at NHS. In the essay, Alexander told what it meant to him to be a Scrapper.
“My high school career is over,” he said in the essay. “I’ll never forget going on the field on Friday night. There’s no better feeling. It’s a real blessing what God has opened for me. I had a great relationship with my coaches going back to seventh grade. They got on me on the field, but it was their way of showing they loved me. I’m thankful for everything. As they say in Nashville, ‘Once a Scrapper, Always a Scrapper.’”
The MVP presentation was the climax of a night of accolades for the Scrappers. Position coaches presented a number of awards to their players, including the following:
Outstanding Defensive LIneman – Coach Jerry Baker presented the award to LT Muldrow. “He made my job easy. He led our defensive front and taught our younger kids to work and showed the value of dedication to the game. He’s a special young man and made a big impact on my life,” Baker said. Muldrow had 76 tackles, 6 tackles for a loss and 13 hurries.
Outstanding Offensive LIneman – Coach D.J. Graham presented the award to Cameron Alexander. “He had 65 big blocks, 30 STAR plays, a 93 percent grading average,” Graham said. “He anchored our O-line. He worked himself into the best lineman in the conference. He will develop into the best on his college team,” Graham said. Alexander is a two-time Outstanding Lineman of the Year for the Scrappers and was Lineman of the Year in District 7-4A.
Outstanding Receiver -  Coach Paul Ernest presented the award to LaMichael Pettway. For the season, Pettway had 56 receptions for 1,058 yards, 15 touchdown receptions and 2 rushing touchdowns.
Outstanding Defensive Back – Coach Brian Bearden presented the award to Leonard Snell, who recently was named to the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette’s Super Sophomore team.
Outstanding Defensive Linebacker – Coach Brian “Boomer” Brown presented the award to Ashton Walker, whose first extensive action came against Watson Chapel, where he played before transferring to Nashville. Walker had 71 tackles and 3 TFLs. “He’s one of the most coachable athletes I’ve seen,” Brown said.
Outstanding Running Back – Coach Billy Dawson presented the award to Kyler Lawrence. The senior “had a great career here,” Dawson said, and played on offense and defense. He had 1,055 yards receiving and running, 15 touchdowns, 39 tackles and 4 break-ups.
Outstanding Special Teams – Coach Jerry Baker said the recipient was Christian Aranda, who was unable to attend the banquet. Aranda, the Scrapper kicker, made 41 of 45 PATs and 2 of 2 field goals for a total of 47 points.
Champion Awards Defense – Recipients were David Galvan and Charles Furr.
Champion Awards Offense – Recipients were Lee Scroggins and Curtis Myers.
All-District – Coach Billy Dawson introduced All-District selections, including first team Cameron Alexander, LT Muldrow, Tyler Parker and LaMichael Pettway; second team Braden Hood, Leonard Snell, Billy Stewart and Kyler Lawrence; honorable mention Asher Walker, Kory Snodgrass, Ashton Walker, Storm Nichols and Lucas Liggin.
All-State – Cameron Alexander, LaMichael Pettway.
All-Star – Cameron Alexander. He was named the Outstanding Lineman in District 7-4A and will play in the Arkansas All-Star game June 27 at the University of Central Arkansas.
Permanent Team Captains – Cameron Alexander, Eric Perez and LT Muldrow. “They were selected by their peers,” Dawson said. “I told the players that they were voting for strong work ethic, someone who stands up for what’s right, someone that 10 years from now, you’ll still be proud of them. You know, the players get it right every year. They’re always watching. Our choices this year are three unbelievable human beings. Ten years from now, they’ll be owning companies, preaching, coaching, doing something to make us proud. They’ll carry the Scrapper Star with them everywhere.”

 

Auburn assistant Scrapper Showdown guest speaker

The Scrapper Showdown will be held Saturday, Feb. 8, at 6:30 p.m. at the Nashville Elementary School cafeteria.
Tickets are $15 and are on sale by Scrappers, Scrapperettes and cheerleaders.  The ticket price includes a barbecue dinner.
The guest speaker for the Showdown will be J.B. Grimes, offensive line coach at Auburn University. Grimes is a familiar face in Arkansas coaching circles. He began his career as an assistant coach at Nashville. He has been an assistant coach at a number of NCAA D-1 programs, including Arkansas and Arkansas State. When former Red Wolves coach Gus Malzahn moved to Auburn, he named Grimes as his offensive line coach.
Scrapper Booster Club members are rounding up items for live and silent auctions, along with prizes for Heads or Tails and the basketball game. Fans will play Heads or Tails for a TV and the basketball shooting game for an iPad Mini.
Among the auction items already secured are Razorback basketball tickets for the Arkansas/Georgia game Saturday, March 1; reserved parking spot at Scrapper Arena, reserved hospitality room and VIP seating at the arena, crappie fish fry, Scrapper quilt, Scrapper rug, golf club, WeedEater, load of gravel and a tool set.
Others include Texas Ranger baseball tickets, NASCAR tickets at Texas Motor Speedway, an Arkansas Razorback football autographed by Coach Bret Bielema, and an autographed basketball by the Memphis Grizzlies.
More items include Cheerleader for a Day, Captain for a Day, a reserved parking spot at Scrapper Stadium, and a booth in the stadium press box.
There will be numerous items and gift certificates from area merchants.
The Showdown is a Booster Club fund-raiser which benefits the Nashville athletic program.
More details of the event will be announced.
Showdown speaker familiar to local fans
Sports Information Office
Auburn University
With more than 30 years coaching at the collegiate level on his resume, J.B. Grimes, who helped the Tigers to a 2013 SEC Championship and a BCS Championship berth this past season, is completing his first season as the offensive line coach at Auburn.
The offensive line paved the way for the Tigers to lead the nation in rushing with 335.7 yards per game. Running back Tre Mason was a Heisman Trophy finalist and named the SEC Player of the Year while Nick Marshall was an Associated Press honorable mention All-SEC selection. The line allowed only 1.23 sacks per game to tie for 21st nationally.
Grimes, who coached in his 16th bowl game and has coached numerous NFL players, spent the 2012 season as the offensive line coach at Arkansas State with Auburn head coach Gus Malzahn.
“J.B. is a tremendous coach who is one of the nation’s top teachers at the offensive line position,” Malzahn said. “He has an incredible resume coaching the position and has taught countless players at the NFL level. We’re fortunate to have him in our program at Auburn.”
During the 2012 season at Arkansas State, Grimes coached an offensive line unit that helped set a school record with 481.8 yards of total offense per game while ranking 16th nationally in fewest sacks allowed. Senior offensive lineman Zach McKnight earned first-team All-Sun Belt honors under Grimes’ direction as the offense led the Sun Belt in rushing and ranked in the top 25 nationally in total offense, scoring offense and rushing offense.
Prior to his arrival at ASU, Grimes spent two seasons at Kansas (2010-11) and Mississippi State (2004-08) as the offensive line coach. Grimes’ coaching career also includes stints at East Carolina, Texas A&M, Virginia Tech, Arkansas, Louisiana-Monroe and Delta State as an assistant coach over the last three decades.
In his first season at Mississippi State, the Bulldogs rushed for 1,744 yards, the most at the school in four years. Behind his offensive line, MSU produced three seasons with a 1,000-yard rusher. In his one season at East Carolina (2003), the Pirates’ offensive line paved the way for its third straight 1,000-yard individual rusher. At Texas A&M (1998-2002), Grimes coached the offensive line under R.C. Slocum as the Aggies posted a 40-22 overall record while playing in four straight bowl games.
While at Virginia Tech (1993-97) coaching for Frank Beamer, Grimes helped the Hokies to back-to-back Big East Championships and five bowl games in five seasons.
Grimes also coached at Arkansas, serving as a graduate assistant in 1981-82 and as a full-time assistant coach in 1989-92, where he helped the Razorbacks to the Southwest Conference championship and a Cotton Bowl appearance in 1990. At Arkansas, Grimes worked for Lou Holtz, Ken Hatfield and Jack Crowe.
Grimes also coached at Louisiana-Monroe (1979-80; 1985-88), Delta State (1983) and Missouri (1984) after spending his first two seasons at the high school level in Arkansas, at Nashville (1977) and Des Arc (1978). Louisiana-Monroe won the 1987 Division I-AA national championship.
As an offensive lineman at Henderson State, he helped his team to a 40-6 record in four seasons, including a berth in the 1974 NAIA Championship game. He earned a bachelor’s degree in education from Henderson State in 1977 and a master’s degree in education from Louisiana-Monroe in 1981.
Grimes grew up in Clarendon, Ark., and is married to the former Jennifer Graves of Nashville; she received a degree in advertising and public relations from Arkansas. The couple has four children, sons Aaron and Nick and daughters Danielle and Lindsey.

Dierks Dixie Youth baseball sign-up Feb. 16

Registration for Dierks Dixie Youth baseball (ages 4-13) will be held Sunday, Feb. 16 from 2-4 p.m. at the Dierks Community Building, across from the post office.
Parents will need to bring a copy of their child’s birth certificate and a $40 registration fee. Parents can also turn in forms and fee at the front office of Jo Ann Walters Elementary School. Checks can be made payable to Dierks Dixie Youth Baseball.
There will be a $10 late fee for registrations made after the Feb. 16 deadline. Players will not be allowed to register after league teams have been drafted.
For more information, contact Jason Smith at (870) 245-7473.

Spring soccer registration underway

Registration is underway for the 2014 Spring Soccer Season sponsored by Nashville Parks and Recreation.
Youth from Mineral Springs, Dierks, Murfreesboro and Nashville are welcome. A $40 registration fee includes the team shirt and trophy. Age divisions will be determined by the number of players that sign up and the age of a child as of Feb. 1. Practice and games will be held at the Nashville City Park. All levels of experience are welcome.
Registration forms may be picked up at the Nashville City Park Office, 1301 West Johnson St., Nashville.  Phone (870) 845-7405 between the hours of 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.
The deadline to register is Saturday, Feb. 15.

Remodeling project nearing completion at auto dealership

REMODELING. York Gary Autoplex in Nashville has undergone extensive renovation, including a new showroom and the new blue Chevrolet tower in the front. The changes were required by General Motors to ensure that dealerships nationwide have a recognizable appearance.

By Jana Copeland
Leader staff
Eighteen months ago, a major endeavor was taking form and plans made for an extreme remodel of York Gary Autoplex in Nashville. A nation-wide standard remodel for all General Motors dealerships was initiated in 2009-2010 by the newest director of the GM company. This standard remodel was designed to make all GM dealerships look similar across the country. It enhances the “branded experience” of recognizable logos and look.
Gary Dan Futrell, owner of York Gary, delayed the remodel for 18 months and then filed for an extension for another 6 months. The reason for the upgrade was because of the new standard requirements. “I’m glad I’m doing this remodel because it will benefit the important part of our business, which are our loyal customers,” Futrell said.
Employees were on board with the remodel, and their input was taken into consideration with respect to different aspects of the the project where it could be incorporated with GM’s ultimate design.
The service department is one area that was included in the upgrade. GM said that the dealers needed to separate the mechanics from the customers. Futrell fought and lost this battle with the GM company, trying to maintain a more visible view of that area.
To gain that visibility, there will be a total of 12 cameras to view all areas throughout the dealership. These cameras will be used to find guests easier when their vehicles are finished being serviced or to better see guests shopping for a vehicle on the lots. “Another battle I fought and lost was keeping the tile that I had upgraded only a few years ago and to pick our own office furniture and layout,” Futrell said. GM standards call for a certain style and color of furniture, floor coverings, and ceiling tiles that are non-negotiable.
A new phone system was not a requirement, but Futrell felt it would be beneficial for better communications throughout the dealership.
The office showroom area is being remodeled because the standard says there should be no sales offices on exterior walls, and there is the new requirement for a 3-car showroom. That is why the addition was made to the existing building.
“In addition to the flat screen tv and refreshments which we are currently providing, the plan calls for a media area in the waiting room with wi-fi availability for the guests to have a more relaxing and productive experience,” Futrell said.
There are three companies that build for GM. The towers are different heights because of the different designs of buildings. Gensler is the company that mills the towers. Representatives came in to take still-shots and laser measurements of the building. Each tower takes 10 weeks to mill, and they are milled separately for each dealership and installed by that company.
J. D. L. Construction of Texarkana is the primary construction company for the project. The firm had already remodeled three dealerships and is also a loyal costumer of York Gary. Futrell said that local sub-contractors were used for everything that was possible to get the community involved in the effort.
The timeline of the project started about 18 months ago. Because of company concerns about dealerships looking tired and outdated and wanting to enhance the customer satisfaction with a branded experience being the same wherever a guest entered a GM dealership, a Design Intent Document was agreed upon by Futrell and the Zone Manager and signed listing the changes that were to be made at York Gary Autoplex. Futrell said that 90% of the job is scheduled to be completed by the end of March. The office furniture has been ordered and all that will be left after that will be the final touches.
“The remodel has been stressful and has been disruptive at times for all at the dealership and guests,” Futrell said.
At times, there have been areas and entrances that were blocked off, saw dust, and noise have been distracting to the guests and employees throughout the whole process. Workers are trying to do more of the disruptive jobs after hours and on the weekend. “My employees have done a wonderful job of continuing to take care of our guests, despite the noise and distractions that have come with this project,” Futrell said.
Futrell wants to thank his guests for being patient and working around their remodel and wants to assure the customers that the expectations they have come to know and trust from his dealership will be the same.
“I want the customers to have the best experience possible and with this remodel and upgrades, I feel the customers or ‘guests’ will benefit in a positive way,” Futrell said.

Nashville School District: Contract extended; laptops approved

By John R. Schirmer
Leader staff
The Nashville School Board voted Jan. 21 to extend Superintendent Doug Graham’s contract through the 2016-17 academic year.
The vote came following a one-hour executive session. Graham met with the board for 30 minutes during the executive session.
The local school district followed its usual procedure of rehiring the superintendent in January. Re-employment of building principals, assistant principals, certified and classified personnel will follow in February and March.
Graham has been superintendent since 2006. Before that, he had served as junior high principal, athletic director and assistant superintendent.
Laptops
In other business during last week’s meeting, the board took the first step toward providing one-to-one devices for students. Board members approved Graham’s recommendation to purchase 300 Asus touchscreen laptops to share between junior high and high school.
The laptops will cost $375 each, making the total purchase $112,500. The district will also order 10 carts with charging stations.
“After over a year of debate, the laptop is a good investment,” Graham said. “I think it’s time. This should be a neat, 21st century learning environment.”
Graham had earlier considered Chromebooks but decided on the Asus laptops because they are Windows based and provide more options for students.
Technology director Gayland Hopper said the wi-fi network at junior high and high school will be able to accommodate the extra usage from the new laptops.
The district pays $10,000 a year for Microsoft operating licenses, including Office. The cost covers every computer in the district, Hopper said. The new laptops “will integrate well with what we already have. The Chromebook has its niche, but Windows 8 is right for us.”
Laptops will also be purchased for primary and elementary school. Both campuses will receive money from the Arkansas Department of Education as a reward for improved student achievement, and the funds will be used for laptops. The two schools together will receive about $47,000 from the state.
Nashville is among the schools selected to pilot the new PARCC testing program this spring. Testing will be done online instead of with a pencil and bubble-in answer sheet. The new computers will be used to administer the tests, and Graham wants students and teachers to become familiar with them before testing begins.
“If we put them in students’ hands for the test without using them before, we’re looking at a train wreck,” Graham said.
Inservice
Literacy Coach Vickie Beene presented the board’s monthly inservice program. She said literacy teachers hold monthly meetings during which “they spend all day working on Common Core lessons. The teachers love it.” Sessions are held for grades 4-6, 7-9 and 10-12.  Elementary Principal Latito Williams introduced Beene to livebinders.com, a website which allows teachers to collaborate on lesson plans and ideas for their classrooms.
Fourth grade teachers recently received a Rockefeller Foundation grant for $1,573 to use for a Common Core module on the American Revolution. Beene plans to apply for grants for other grades in coming months.
Beene recently attended Spelling Bees at elementary and junior high. “I was amazed. Those kids weren’t told to do it. They just kept coming. About 50 competed,” she said.
Nashville students participated in a reading fair through the De Queen/Mena Educational Co-operative.
Common Core “is taking a hit in the media lately,” Beene said. “People are saying negative things and don’t know anything about it.”
Beene said it been “a privilege to serve in this role. I’m enjoying being in classrooms with our teachers. They’re not afraid to jump out and try new things.”
Other business
Graham said the district has received the preliminary exit report on its audit. “The good news is that it’s one of the cleanest we’ve ever had. There were no major findings,” he said. “The bad news is that there are too many free and reduced lunch applications with mistakes on them. This is the second year in a row we’ve been cited for that. We will have to write an improvement plan.” Building principals will work with food services director Tina Conzel to deal with the problem, according to Graham.
“We don’t want a repeat finding on the audit.”
Principals are working on student badges, Graham said. “I want to identify every student” as a security precaution. “We will have them for Nashville students on our campuses. Visitors will be easily identified. I want to have faculty and student badges in place as soon as possible. I want us to be as safe as we can be.”
Lifetouch Photography offers the ID badge service, Graham said. Lifetouch is the district’s photography company.
In a personnel matter at last week’s meeting, the board accepted the resignation of technology director Gayland Hopper effective March 31. Hopper began working in the district in 1996, Graham said. “He’s a familiar face. The district has seen information technology come a million miles. We’re going to miss him,” Graham said.
The district will advertise the position.

 

Ladies’ Night Out at Dierks FBC

GUEST SPEAKER. Charlotte Strickland of Conway (at right) was the guest speaker during the First Baptist Church of Dierks “Ladies’ Night Out” event Monday night. Strickland is pictured with Anna Blase.

DIERKS – The Ladies’ Night Out was held Monday, Jan. 27, at 6:30 pm. at the First Baptist Church in Dierks.  About 180 attended.
Anna Blase gave the welcome, Julia Shankles led the music, prayers were offered by Christine Morris, Hollie Jones and Rachel Garner.
The speaker was Charlotte Strickland from Conway. Charlotte’s speech was  humorous  and inspirational. She challenged the ladies to live life to its fullest so much that their “cups would run over with love.”
The tables in the fellowship hall were lavishly decorated in keeping with the “Victorian Tea Party” theme. The meal was served by men of the church assisted by young ladies. Door prizes were given after the meal.

Mine Creek Revelations: Centennial anew

CABIN FEVER. Went to the doc last week because I just couldn’t get over a cough and sore throat. Did I mention I felt lousy? I believe this was a respiratory infection that was making the rounds in our community. Since it made me feel so bad, I’m amazed that it didn’t kill hundreds who weren’t in my splendid physical condition.
I spent the entire weekend whining and moaning on my recliner in front of the television. Left the house exactly two times for a grand total of 30 minutes, and that was to pick up hamburgers.
A lot of the time I spent hoping some drug-crazed psycho would break down the door and attack me with a machete and put me out of my misery. I’m telling you, I felt bad.
As I said, most of the weekend was spent on my recliner with the TV droning.
But something really nice happened. I came across a satellite channel which was broadcasting the entire 12 episodes of one of my all-time favorite TV mini-series, “Centennial.”
I watched the whole thing except for the times my cough syrup made me drop off for a short medicated snooze.
Centennial. I had forgotten how much I liked the late Alex Karras in the role of Potato Brumbaugh. And there was another former football player who had a role. Former UCLA quarterback Mark Harmon had a small but nice role as an Army officer with a conscience. Harmon is now my very favorite TV character, Leroy Jethro Gibbs, NCIS special agent.
Centennial is one of the seven or eight James A. Michener books I’ve read. I have not been disappointed in any of them.
I believe that in all of his books, Michener starts out giving the reader a thorough lecture in geography, geology or history which has a place in later developments. I read once that he had a huge force of researchers for his books.
Centennial was the story of the development of the West focusing on a spot in the grasslands which became the mythical town of Centennial, Colorado.
At this point in my life, I like happy endings. Michener just does not give you those. In several of the episodes the villain wins. But that’s pretty true of life, isn’t it?
One of my very favorite books is “The Source,” a Michener book about religions and cultures in the Middle East. The ‘source’  in “The Source” is a spring which trickles out of a cave. Civilizations develop and dissolve, settlements grow up and crumble around that spring during the passage of centuries. The book is ‘historical fiction,’ and a lot of real life characters pass through the walls of the settlement. The book is about the people who lived there. It’s about the formation of religions and what the Hebrews owe the pagans, what the Christians owe the Hebrews, what the Muslims owe the Christians and Hebrews. It’s about our inhumanity to each other and today’s headlines of that area would fit perfectly in the story.
Off the top of my head, some other Michener books I’ve read include Texas, Tales of the South Pacific, Chesapeake, Caravans, Space, Hawaii, The Drifters, Return to Paradise, Sayanora, Something Else and Something Else.
So I am grateful in a way for my sore throat, because I am now inspired to go back and read the Michener books I’ve missed.
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THE 12TH MAN. The unique thematic ‘12th man’ began at Texas A&M mucho years ago. They just pick some guy out of the student body and let him play on kickoffs, figuring, correctly, that it gets the aforementioned student body more involved in the game.
So, I was surprised to see Seattle Seahawks fans unabashedly waving 12th Man flags in one of the playoff games.
Recently, I read where the Seahawks pay Texas A&M $5,000 per year to use ‘12th Man.’
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WEIGHT WATCHERS. Weight Watchers meets in the activities building at Ridgeway Baptist Church out on Peachtree Street. Weigh-in begins at 5, with lashing and flogging to follow.
Since I didn’t exercise for the six days that I was sick, and since I did nothing but graze on things that are not exactly on the Weight Watchers approved list during that time, I expected nothing but bad news at Monday night’s weigh-in.
What I got, though, was a weight loss of 5 pounds over the past 2 weeks. You’ll recall that I missed last week’s weigh-in because I was at the MLK Celebration.
I think I’ll run out and order a pizza with fries.
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THINGS I LEARNED from opening email: The Eisenhower interstate highway system requires that one mile in every five must be straight. These straight sections are to be usable as airstrips in times of war or other emergencies.
Remember a few years ago when the pilot of a private single-engine airplane had to land on a straight stretch of Highway 870 west of Dierks? A nearby landowner let the pilot park his airplane on his property, and he took off without incident next day.
I have been corrected: My colleagues at ‘The Leader’ say that it happened “many” years ago, not a few years ago.
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 HE SAID: “I’m facing Niagara Falls – the wind and the mist and the dark and the peregrine falcons – and I’m going to stay focused on the other side.” Nik Wallenda, tightrope walker
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SHE SAID: “If a man is truly in love, the most beautiful woman in the world couldn’t take him away. Maybe for a few days, but not forever.” Eva Gabor, actress
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SWEET DREAMS, Baby

Obituaries

Ruby Marie Johnson Walls
Ruby Marie Johnson Walls, age 88, of Murfreesboro, died Friday, Jan. 24, 2014.
She was born on Feb. 26, 1925 at Nathan, the daughter of  Marion T. Lamb and Nettie M. Hutchings Lamb. She was preceded in death by her first husband, Reuben E. “Blackie” Johnson; her second husband, Hearl Walls; her daughter, Inell Brewer; her step-son, Raymond Walls; her step-daughter, Bernice Rogers; three grandchildren, Allan Johnson, John Michael Johnson and Christina Deberry; her great-granddaughter, Tiffany Golden; three brothers, Allan Lamb, Jewel Lamb and Floyd Lamb; and three sisters, Minnie White, Ethel Allen and Annie Pearl Suttles.
She was a member of the Harvest Time Assembly of God Church and attended the Murfreesboro Senior Citizens Center. She enjoyed quilting and gardening. In her earlier years, she loved to fish and camp on Lake Greeson.
She is survived by three sons and two daughters-in-law, Walter E. and Shirley Johnson of Lake Forest, Calif., Ray Johnson of Hampshire, Tenn. and Joe and Linda Johnson of Nash, Texas; two daughters and one son-in-law, Edith Witt of Kennesaw, Ga. and Deronda and Ray Daniel of Fort Smith; two sisters and one brother-in-law, Nellie and J. C. Hadaway of Ashdown and Mildred Austin of Reno, Nev.; her sister-in-law, Nelda Barton of Nashville; 14 grandchildren; 20 great-grandchildren; five great-great-grandchildren; and several nieces and nephews.
Services will be held at 10 a.m., Saturday, Feb. 1, 2014 in the Harvest Time Assembly of God Church with Rev. Joe Kelley and Rev. Jon Funderburg officiating.
Visitation will be held on Friday, 5-7 p.m. at the church.
Interment will be in the Biggs Chapel Cemetery under the direction of Davis-Smith Funeral Home, Glenwood.
Guest registry is at www.davis-smith.com.
Jo Evelyn Coody Ritchie
Jo Evelyn Coody Ritchie, age 78 of Nashville, passed away Friday, Jan. 24, 2014 in Little Rock, Ark. She was born June 5, 1935 in New Orleans, La. to the late Henry F. and Winifred Kilborn Culver, Sr. She was a retired teller and processor for First National Bank. Jo was a faithful member of the First United Methodist Church in Nashville. She loved farming, traveling and spending time with her grandchildren and great grandchildren. She was a member of the church choir and the Pairs and Spares Sunday school class. She loved sports and was a medalist in the Junior Olympics years ago.
Preceding her in death was her first husband, John Tine Spangle in 1978; her second husband, Barney Coody, Jr. in 1998; and her third husband, Howard Ritchie in 2004. Also a brother, Henry F. Culver, Jr. in 2006.
Her survivors include: her children, Karen Mumau and husband, Doug of Nashville, Ark., Billy Spangle and wife, Debbie of Germantown, Tenn.; A special family friend, Betty J. Smith of Nashville; two grandchildren, Alicia Wescott and husband Justin of Nashville, and Stephanie Null and husband Warren of Dierks; six great-grandchildren, Wade, Emily and Adilynn Westcott of Nashville, Brashten and Zayden Null of Dierks, also a future great granddaughter, McKenzey Evelyn Null. Also, numerous step- children, grandchildren and great grandchildren as well as a host of other family and friends.
Services were 2 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014 at First United Methodist Church in Nashville with Gene Fulcher and Mark Wall officiating. Interment was Wednesday, Jan. 29, 2014 in the San de Austin Cemetery in San Felipe, Texas.
The family received friends at the church on Tuesday from 1 p.m. until service time. You may send the family an online sympathy message to www.nashvillefh.com.
Nora Lou Blase
DECATUR, Texas – Nora Lou Blase, 89, went to be with our Lord, Tuesday, Jan. 21, 2014 in Decatur, Texas.
Funeral service was at 11 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 25, at Coker-Hawkins Funeral Home Chapel with Rev. David Blase officiating. Interment was in Oaklawn Cemetery. The family received friends from 6-8 p.m. Friday, Jan. 24, at Coker-Hawkins Funeral Home.
Pallbearers included Johnny Blase, Don Lyles, Ron Patterson, Mike North, John North and Johnny Scheuermann.
Nora was born May 6, 1924, in Lewisville, Texas, to Sam Cornelius and Callie Elizabeth (Hicks) Patterson. She attended Decatur Public School (grades 1-10). Nora was united in marriage to Charles Alvin Blase on Oct. 1, 1939 in Denton, Texas. Nora and Charlie operated dairy farms at Decatur, Rhome, Boyd, Greenwood and Alvord for 23 years, until they retired in 1979. Nora was a member of the First Baptist Church of Decatur.
Nora was preceded in death by her husband in June, 2000; her parents; and all 7 of her siblings and their spouses.
Left behind to cherish her memory are her two sons, David Blase and wife Anna of Nashville, Ark., and Olin Blase and wife, Janelle of Decatur; three grandsons, John Blase and wife Meredith of Monument, Colo., Shawn Blase and wife Tonja of Texarkana, and Curtis Blase and wife Candi of Runaway Bay; and seven great-grandchildren.
Edith Aylene Bass
Edith Aylene Bass, 94, of Nashville, formerly of Texarkana, died Sunday, Jan. 26, 2014 in Nashville.
She was born Sept. 22, 1919 in Nashville to the late Luther A. Holcombe and Ada Lee Alexander Holcombe.
She was a member of the First Baptist Church in Texarkana, Ark.
She was preceded in death by her first husband, Jessie Roy Johnson; her second husband, Edwin Bass; two brothers, Elton Holcombe and James Holcombe; and one infant sister.
Graveside services under the direction of Latimer Funeral Home were at 10 a.m. Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014 at Bingen-Ozan Cemetery in Bingen with Bro. Kevin Sartin officiating.

Strange case lands in Howard County court

Oh, what a tangled web we weave
When first we practice to deceive
Oh, qué una maraña que tejen 
En la primera podemos practicar para engañar
The “lawyer” got his client off with probation in her case, but the lawyer himself will serve a minimum of nine months in an Arkansas prison for falsely representing himself as an attorney.
Anthony Calderon, 52, Hispanic male, who gave a Springdale address but who may actually be residing in Hope, had a Hot Springs attorney as his counsel, last Wednesday,  when he professed intentions to fight the charges. However, he switched his plea to guilty when he learned of more impending charges related to his false career as an attorney.
Judge Charles Yeargan sentenced Calderon to four years in the Arkansas Department of Correction, with two years suspended and the remaining two years to be served in a Regional Punishment Facility. He must make restitution of $700 to a person who once paid him for legal services, and must serve 10 days in jail on that misdemeanor. The ADC sentence was for second degree forgery – signing documents indicating that he was a licensed attorney. He will serve a minimum of nine months before becoming eligible for release, according to one court official here.
Calderon at first balked at a plea offer to avoid a trial, according to Prosecuting Attorney Bryan Chesshir, but switched his not guilty plea when he was shown documents he had signed indicating he was an attorney and actually giving a false law license number.
It was a twisted route which brought Calderon back before a judge in the Howard County courtroom.
Last year he had represented a woman who was charged with forgery. She pleaded guilty and was sentenced to probation. So, that was one false representation in the courtroom in a criminal case.
Nashville Criminal Investigator Larry Marion said he had been approached by a Canadian citizen who said he had paid Calderon to get an extension for his Visa. Calderon disappeared without doing the work, and the man went to Marion with his story and a picture of his “attorney.” Marion recognized Calderon and learned from Washington County officials that Calderon was in trouble for similar false representation there.
In the meantime, Calderon had apparently moved from Springdale to Hope and had opened a furniture store in Nashville catering to Hispanics, the investigator said.
When the date approached for Calderon’s appearance on the criminal charge, Circuit Clerk Bobbie Jo Green remembered that he had represented one side in a civil case between factions of a splintered Hispanic church. He had prepared land transfer documents for one side, once again representing himself as an attorney-at-law.
The “other” side in that civil case managed to have the land transfer negated in 2011 as a result of Calderon’s participation. No one on the “criminal side” of the court was aware of the civil case until Clerk Green brought it to their attention.
No one would speculate about what would happen to the woman who was sentenced to probation for her own forgery charge, and Calderon still faces similar charges in Washington County.
(Leader note: The Spanish quote at the beginning of the article was a translation produced by a source on the Internet. The quote is from the epic poem “Mamion” by Walter Scott.)

 

Elementary students say ‘no’ to cyber bullying

QUICK RESPONSE. Nashville Elementary students respond to questions from Rachel Ellis of the Arkansas Attorney General’s office during a program on Internet safety Jan. 16.

By Jana Copeland
Leader staff
In today’s society, kids are on the Internet to play video games, do research for projects, and check social networks on a daily basis. Even though their parents stress the importance of being safe while on the Internet, the school felt like it would help for them to hear it from other sources.
On Thursday, Jan. 16, Rachel Ellis from the Attorney General’s Office came to Nashville Elementary School to talk to the students. She talked to the fourth, fifth, and sixth grade students about Internet safety and cyber bullying.
Students received an activity/informative booklet over Internet safety. Included in the booklet were safety quizzes for the children, fill in the blanks about rules they should follow, word searches about Internet safety, and crossword puzzles. In addition to the fun activities, they received pages full of information about not answering personal questions or giving out personal information, how to handle cyber bullies, and a cyberspace chatting checklist for them to consider.
Several of the fourth grade students shared what they learned from the assembly. Ella Ragar said that she learned to always block online predators when playing a game or just on the the Internet and Ellen Spigner learned that news spreads fast.
“I learned not to use my real name as my screen on Facebook or Instagram,” Madison Gray said.
“I thought the show was great,” Jaylee Walker said. “I learned not to put simple passwords and if someone follows you that you don’t know, block them so it will never happen again. If the person is making you uncomfortable, tell a parent and they will block it for you.”
Katherine Talley learned that the fact that it is not safe to have your name in your username. “Also, the fact that you shouldn’t tell anyone except your parents your password to games.”
Avery Hood said, “I never thought about how important it was not to out personal info on the Internet.”
Attorney General Dustin McDaniel said, “The Internet is a place where we can find a lot of useful information, talk to our friends and even get help with our homework. While the Internet has the potential to be a very useful resource, you should know that it also has the potential to be a danger to your personal safety.”

 

Husqvarna to purchase EPI

Assets of the Engineered Products Industries (EPI) in Nashville will be purchased by the company’s principal customer, Husqvarna.
EPI had produced molded plastic products for Husqvarna, and the plant will continue to do so, according to a company spokesperson. EPI has operated in a plant originally built by OxBodies, Inc., located north of Nashville.
Husqvarna recently announced that it had borrowed funds to install a plating operation inside one of its Nashville plants. The plating operation is expected to be working late in 2014, and could result in 100 new jobs.
The company issued the following statement:
“Husqvarna Group, the world’s largest producer of outdoor power products, is planning to purchase certain assets of Engineered Products Industries, L.L.C. (EPI), a custom plastic injection molding company with operations in Nashville, Ark. The acquisition is expected to be completed by a member of the Husqvarna family of companies on or about Jan. 31, 2014.
“Husqvarna has a significant presence in Nashville and values its relationships with its customers and the community. In an effort to ensure continued efficient operation of Husqvarna’s existing manufacturing facility in Nashville, Husqvarna is acquiring assets of EPI … including an assignment of the lease for its facility. Husqvarna believes the local capabilities, including both the facility and employees, can be developed to become advantages to Husqvarna’s business operations.
“Other than the leasehold obligations going forward for EPI’s facility, Husqvarna is not assuming or otherwise acquiring any liabilities or obligations of EPI.
“Upon closing the transaction, Husqvarna will align management and technical resources at the newly acquired facility (the Nashville Plastics Operation) to ensure that the Nashville plastics operation successfully supports the Husqvarna Group’s operations. This includes current full-time EPI employees, who will be invited to apply for employment
 “We are pleased to acquire assets of EPI’s in Nashville,” said Tony Cochran, general manager Nashville, Husqvarna, “which will contribute to our business and operational efficiencies, maintain a stable work force in the community and facilitate production of the world’s best outdoor power equipment by the Husqvarna Group.”

 

South Pike County School District trying to catch up with technology

By John Balch
Leader staff
“I think technology is here and it’s gonna stay here, and I think we’re getting behind,” said South Pike County School Board member Steve Conly during last week’s monthly meeting.
Conly’s comments came after the board heard a technology report from Karen Richardson, the district’s technology coordinator. During the report, Richardson said online testing required by the state Department of Education will mandate the district to ramp up it’s technological abilities.
This coming spring the district will pilot the Partnership Assessment for Readiness for College and Career (PARCC) program which will involve online testing for a small random portion of students in both elementary and high school. Next year, Richardson said, more than 270 students will be involved in the PARCC testing and the district needs to prepare to purchase more computers to accommodate the testing.
“We will have to make changes before next year,” she informed the board. “We have to be prepared – computer-wise and bandwidth-wise – for all those kids to test at the same time.”
Conly said the district needs to implement a two-year plan to keep up with technology. “My dream, I guess, is to put a machine in every kid’s hand,” he added.
The district is still researching what kind of devices will be better suited for students in different grades. Richardson said she is still leaning toward iPads for elementary students and Chromebooks or laptop computers for the older students. The district can purchase 200 iPads – and a MacBook computer to load software – from Apple for $146,705. Apple also offers a program where 200 of the devices can be leased for $55,478 a year for three years and be bought out at the end of the lease agreement. Richardson said the lease plan would help with the budget process but expressed her concern about how fast technology becomes obsolete.
Conly said he does not want to purchase devices for the sole purpose of testing but to also be able to use the devices to enhance traditional teaching. He said the district should also be prepared to efficiently train teachers in how to teach with devices such as iPads.
Richardson agreed, “If you implement project-based learning and you do it so that the students are truly benefitting, then you have to have grade-level teachers that collaborate to make this project work.”
The 80 computers recently purchased for teachers are in use and the recent wireless Internet upgrade is working, Richardson added. “I think it is working great because no one is griping.”
The district has established a technology committee made up of Richardson, teachers, staff members, administrators, students, board members and community members to begin addressing the district’s technology needs. Person wanting to participate in the committee are asked to contact Richardson on the Murfreesboro High School campus.
In other business last Tuesday, the board approved a resolution concerning the district’s six-year facilities plan, which is required by the state.
Superintendent Roger Featherston called the plan “pie in the sky” and that any and all facility needs should be included in the plan to qualify for state partnership money. A copy of six-year plan was available for review in the lobby of the gym during a night of basketball games and Featherston said he was not surprised that the only comments submitted involved building a new gym.
“I can’t disagree with that,” he said of the district’s need for a new gym. But he also questioned whether the district could afford a new gym.
New Pike County Office of Emergency Management Coordinator Austen Walls attended the meeting and Featherston said Walls’ office could possible secure Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) funds that could be used to help pay for the construction of the gym. The federal funds could maybe be used for a new gym if the facility qualified as a “safe room.” The issue was not discussed any further other than Walls said he would continue to look into the matter.
Also last week, the board voted to add one year to Featherston’s existing contract. The vote extended the contract to June 30, 2016.

 

Scrappers pick up win over Malvern

By John R. Schirmer
Leader staff
The Nashville Scrappers outscored Malvern 23-6 in the fourth quarter Friday night to take a 58-44 victory over the Leopards at Scrapper Arena.
Senior Cameron Alexander led the Scrapper charge, scoring 16 of his 21 points in the final quarter.
The conference game was close through the first three quarters. The teams were tied at 27 at halftime, and Malvern led 38-35 at the end of the third.
“They picked it up Friday night,” Coach Damon Williams said of his Scrappers. “They did things in the fourth quarter that they haven’t done earlier. They got the ball up the floor and made their lay-ps and free throws most of the time. The took the lead and extended it by making lay-ups and free throws and playing good defense.”
Marco Finley of Malvern scored all 15 of his points in the first three quarters as the Scrappers shut him out in the fourth. “We knew where he was. He had 2 points in the second half. We talked about that at halftime,” Williams said.
“Our guys played well in the fourth. They weren’t bad the other three, but they stepped it up a notch. I’m really pleased with Friday night.”
Alexander’s 21 points led both teams in scoring. Brandon Shamrock added 13 for the Scrappers. Jamie Newton and Trey Hughes had 9 each, and LaMichael Pettway scored 6.
The Scrappers are 7-6 for the season, 3-3 in District 7-4A. They played at Arkansas Baptist at Little Rock Tuesday night in a game that began after the Leader’s press deadline.
Friday night, Nashville will travel to Bauxite to start the second half of the conference season.
“We’ll start over then. Every week is pretty big in the conference the rest of the way,” Williams said.
Arkadelphia is in first place in 7-4A followed by CAC. Ashdown, Baptist, Nashville and Malvern were tied for third going into Tuesday night’s games. “We’ve got to beat CAC,” Williams said. “They’re second; we’re tied for third. We need to keep getting the victories. Everybody is beating up on everybody but Arkadelphia. There’s not another ‘next-best’ team.”
Nashville will host the District 7-4A tournament Feb. 17-22 in Scrapper Arena and will host the Class 4A South regional the following week.
Ashdown
The Scrappers took a 54-40 loss at Ashdown Jan. 14. “We had a terrible fourth quarter,” Williams said. “We got it to a 2-point game and made 4 trips with a chance to tie and missed all of them. Ashdown scored and extended the lead.”

 

Mine Creek Revelations: My hand is blue

AN INVITATION TO KEEP the speeches short. Our town’s Nate Steel, who is a candidate for Attorney General of Arkansas, recently attended the renowned Gillett Coon Supper for the first time. The hallowed event is held in the Gillett High School gym in political years and it raises money for the local football booster club. No statewide politician of either party would dare miss the opportunity to be seen there.
Political candidates are allowed to speak, but are told that they can talk only as long as they can keep their hand in a bucket of ice-water.
That was just a ploy to keep speeches short, Nate says. And it worked.
Nate said he tasted the raccoon and it was “terrible.” It was served with some orange stuff and some yellow stuff. After tasting the ‘coon, attendees are allowed to switch to more traditional fare. Nate said that there were a bunch of men there wearing coonskin hats, and they were really there to eat raccoon, not to hear politicians with blue hands.
He’s been to lots of interesting events on the campaign trail, he reports.
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WELCOME TO OUR TOWN. Nashville will be host to several state high school athletic events beginning in few weeks. Many visitors and many opportunities to make a good impression of our town.
Feb. 26-March 1 — Class 4A South Regional Basketball tourney.
May 9 — Class 4A State Track Meet.
May 9-12 — Class 4A South Regional Softball tourney.
May 15-17 — Class 4A State Baseball tourney.
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VIETNAM VETERANS should mark Friday, Feb. 14 on calendars for the 15th annual Chili Cook-Off which benefits area veterans projects. Former Nashville police chief Larry Yates and I have attended most of the previous 14 chili cookoffs which are held in the student union building at Texarkana College.
My mouth is still burning from last year. And the year before.
An interesting tidbit in the recent newsletter of the Texarkana Area Chapter of Vietnam Veterans of America: In the 2000 US Census, more than 9 million persons falsely claimed to have served in Vietnam. The newsletter states that the problem of ‘been there wannabes’ is a problem for all eras of veterans, but for some reason is worse for the Vietnam era. Why would someone claim to have served if they really didn’t. Sorta like cheating at golf, or Solitaire.
No offense, Texarkana, but I’m taking that 9 million figure with either a dash or a handful of salt.
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EXCELLENT. A coed from Nashville is doing something unusual at Arkansas Tech University. Caitlin Joy Lewis, daughter of Joe and Melanie Lewis, is majoring in graphic design, and her minor is Japanese. How hard can that be?
She’s hoping to go to Japan to further her studies.
I have enough trouble with computer programs in English, and I can’t imagine how hard it would be to learn that durn stuff in Japanese.
She recently made the Dean’s List at Tech.
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THEY’RE BACK. Seen in town, last Wednesday, was Bob Lewis who was a banker here before striking off for Missouri about seven years ago. Bob and Marilou are living in Hope where he is still in banking. Bob had quite a sense of humor. Rumor has it that he is the smallest football lineman ever to play for the SAU Muleriders. Marilou worked many years in the circuit clerk’s office here.
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WEIGHT WATCHERS. Weight Watchers meets in the activities building at Ridgeway Baptist Church out on Peachtree Street. Weigh-in begins at 5, with lashing and flogging to follow.
Because I went to cover the MLK Celebration, Monday night, I was unable to attend weigh-in. I am sure the lying digital scales at home don’t know what they’re talking about because SURELY I haven’t gained THAT much weight in just one week.
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MY HEART IS STILL THUMPING. Couldn’t mail my check to the electric company Monday because of the holiday, so I set it aside on my dining table with all of the other debris.
On Tuesday morning I collected trash from inside my house; dumped it into the trash cart; set the trash cart out streetside.
When I left for work Tuesday I looked for the envelope so I could put it in the mailbox. Where was it? Nowhere to be seen. I tore up the house, and then remembered putting the trash cart out. Went out in the frigid dark and shone my flashlight down into the fragrant depths of the cart.
You know the rest. Luckily, I could reach the envelope without dumping the entire contents onto the street.
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THINGS I LEARNED from opening email: The Eisenhower interstate highway system requires that one mile in every five must be straight. These straight sections are to be usable as airstrips in times of war or other emergencies.
Remember a few years ago when the pilot of a private single-engine airplane had to land on a straight stretch of Highway 870 west of Dierks? A nearby landowner let the pilot park his airplane on his property, and he took off without incident next day.
I have been corrected: My colleagues at ‘The Leader’ say that it happened “many” years ago, not a few years ago.
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 HE SAID: “Reputation is what men and women think of us; character is what God and angels know of us.” Thomas Paine, one of America’s founding fathers
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SHE SAID: “One glass of water doesn’t equal another. One may just appease the thirst, the other you may enjoy thoroughly.” Jil Sander, clothing designer
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SWEET DREAMS, Baby

Obituaries

Charlene Wright
Charlene Wright, 96, of Mineral Springs went to be with her Lord and Savior on Jan. 16, 2014 at her home surrounded by her loving family and friends. She was born March 15, 1917, in Mineral Springs to the late Willie and Annie Holmes Walker. She was a devoted wife, mother and grandmother.
Charlene was preceded in death by her husband, Gibson Wright, and son, Bobby Wright.
She is survived by sons, Billy Wright and wife Charla of Harrell, Ark.; Charles Wright and wife Peggy of Burleson, Texas; daughters, Elaine Latimer and husband Benny of Bentonville, Ark.; Vickie Kuykendall and husband Jim of Mineral Springs, Ark.; 15 grandchildren, 26 great grandchildren, 1 great-great grandchild and one special friend, Liz Burrus.
She was a faithful member of Central Baptist Church, the Esther Sunday School class, and Sunshine Club where she made her famous desserts, especially banana pudding. She also loved working in her flower beds.
Funeral services under the direction of Latimer Funeral Home were at 2 p.m., Sunday, Jan. 19, 2014 at the funeral home chapel in Nashville. Burial followed in Mineral Springs Cemetery, with Bro. Ben Jones officiating.
Visitation was 5-6:30 p.m., Saturday, Jan. 18, 2014 at the Latimer Funeral Home Chapel in Nashville.
The family extends a special thanks to Dr. Robert Sykes and Dierksen Memorial Hospice, especially Jeana, Wendy, Jeff and Candice for their special care.
Memorials may be made to Central Baptist Church “Operation Christmas Child”,
P.O. Box 69, Mineral Springs, AR 71851.
You may send an online sympathy message to http://www.latimerfuneralhome.com/.
Bobby G. Billings, Sr.
Bobby G. Billings, Sr., age 78, of Center Point, Ark., passed away, Monday, Jan. 20, 2014 in Nashville.
He was born Oct. 1, 1935 in Center Point to the late Sherman Texas and Lois Ruthell Harding Billings. He was a farmer and was retired from Weyerhaeuser Company.
Mr. Billings was a member of the Center Point Church of Christ and had served as a Deacon and Elder in the past. He loved gardening, and was an orchardist. He also was a  cattle farmer, and enjoyed haying with his sons and his cow dog, “Rowdy.” He also had been a chicken farmer in the past.
Preceding him in death was a brother, Glen Billings, as well as a baby sister, Geraldine Billings. Also, two other sisters, Jacqueline Chandler and Juanita Williams.
He is survived by his wife of over 54 years, Betty Kesterson Billings of Center Point;  two sons, Bobby Billings Jr. and wife, Karen, of Center Point, and Steven Billings and wife, April, of Dierks, Ark.; a very special friend, Moe Smith of Ogden, Ark.; six grandchildren, Kristen Owens and husband Trent, Eric Billings, Andrew Billings, Austin Billings, Josh Webb and Jason Webb; two great-great-grandchildren, Hayden Billings and Brynlee Billings; one future great-granddaughter, Kynzlie Owens; and a host of other family and friends.
Services will be Wednesday, Jan. 22, 2014 at 2 p.m. at Center Point Church of Christ with Alan Green and Heath Wallace officiating. Interment will follow in Old Liberty Cemetery near Dierks. The family received friends at the funeral home on Tuesday night from 6-8 pm. You may send the family an online sympathy message to www.nashvillefh.com
Darwin Eric Corbell, Sr.
Darwin Eric “Buzz” Corbell, Sr., 71 of Mineral Springs died Tuesday, Jan. 14, 2014.
He was born March 10, 1942 in Mineral Springs to the late Witten Eric and Gladys Reval Cassady Corbell. He was an Air Force Veteran and was a Baptist.
Survivors include: his wife of 48 years, Alta Walline Corbell of Mineral Springs; five children, Charles R. Tallman, Darwin E. Corbell, Jr., Robin M. Corbell, Melissa A. Shelley and Kerri L. Harris Corbell; two sisters, Lavelle Caldwell and Francis Paider; also grandchildren and great-grandchildren.
Graveside services were Saturday, Jan. 18, 2014 at 2 p.m. at Shiloh Baptist Cemetery near Mineral Springs with Terry Goff and David Raulerson officiating. Arrangements were under the direction of Nashville Funeral Home.
The family received friends at the funeral home on Friday from 5-7 p.m.
Send an online sympathy message to nashvillefh.com.
Shirley J. Fatherree
Shirley J. Fatherree, 65 of Nashville, Ark., died Tuesday, Jan. 14, 2014 in Texarkana.
She was born April 3, 1948 in Nashville to the late William and Verna Ross Tedford. She was a member of First Baptist Church in Nashville.
Survivors include: her husband of over 49 years, Robert Fatherree of Nashville; five children, Randy and Nita Fatherree of Nashville, Tony and Jennifer Fatherree of Nashville, Stacy and John Middleton of Nashville, Christy and Jody Young of Nashville, and Eric Fatherree of Emmet; a sister, Helen Shuptrine of Bentonville; ten grandchildren and five great-grandchildren.
Graveside services were Friday, Jan.17, 2014 at 2 p.m. at Bluff Springs Cemetery with Bro. Don Jones officiating. Arrangements were under the direction of Nashville Funeral Home.
The family received friends at the funeral home on Thursday night from 6-8. Send an online sympathy message to nashvillefh.com.
Jesse Raymond Boler
Jesse Raymond Boler, 74, of De Queen died Wednesday, Jan. 15, 2014 in Texarkana, Texas.
He was born Aug. 20, 1939 in Nashville to the late Luther and Carrie Goodrum Boler.
He was retired from the US Air Force and served in the Vietnam War. He was a member of the First Baptist Church.
He was preceded in death by his siblings, Dale Boler, Lewis Boler, Leon Boler, Lonard Boler, Charles Boler and Louise ‘Pat’ Isley.
Survivors include: his wife of 47 years, Linda Birge Boler of De Queen; two daughters, Regina McCullough of Fairbanks, Alaska, and Renee Cook and husband, Clint, of De Queen; also grandchildren.
Graveside funeral services with military rites were at 2 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 18 in the Valley Cemetery at Gillham under the direction of Chandler funeral Home, De Queen. with Micah Martin officiating.
Clarene S. Helms
Clarene Sherman Helms, 93, of Provo, Ark., died Sunday, Jan. 19, 2014.
She was born Jan. 18, 1921 in Provo to the late Paul and Dora Faulkner Sherman.
She was preceded in death by her husband of 72 years, Marvin William Helms; one son, Marvin Helms, Jr.; a daughter, Sheryl Helms Eudy; a grandson and nine siblings.
Survivors include: eight children, Aubrey “Sonny” Helms of Nashville, Betty Teat of Irving, Texas, Linda Harper of Sheridan, Billy Jack and Vera Helms of Ashdown, Mickey Helms of Provo, Derrel and Jackie Helms of Lockesburg, Terry and Debbie Helms of Provo, and Kem and Anita Helms of Provo; a brother, Will D. Sherman of Euless Texas; also grandchildren, great-grandchildren and great-great-grandchildren.
Funeral services were Jan. 22, 2014 in the Provo Cumberland Presbyterian Church with Bro. Jerrel Helms officiating.
Burial followed in the McHorse Cemetery under the direction of Wilkerson Funeral Home in De Queen.
Jennie Sue Roberson
Jennie Sue Roberson, 66 of Mineral Springs, died Sunday, Jan. 19, 2014.
She was born Oct. 24, 1947 in Murfreesboro, the daughter of the late J.D. Neighbors and Rema Jo Huddleston Neighbors.
She was a member of Liberty Baptist Church.
She was preceded in death by her husband, Richard Roberson.
Survivors include: her son, David Strong and wife, Tina, of Mineral Springs; also grandchildren and a great-grandchild.
A memorial services will be on Friday, Jan. 24, 2014 at Sweet Home Methodist Church in Murfreesboro from 5-7 p.m.

Plan for purchase of Pike County mill falls through

By John Balch
Leader staff
GLENWOOD – “Good gosh a-mighty,” was how Pike County Judge Don Baker reacted last week when he learned the deal for a Louisiana company to purchase the former Bean Lumber Company in Glenwood had fallen through.
Judge Baker learned from The Nashville Leader Friday morning that Hunt Forest Products of Louisiana had announced its plans to rescind its letter of intent to purchase the former Bean Lumber Company from Caterpillar Financial Services.
Caterpillar, doing business as the Florida-based FCC Equipment Financing, purchased the troubled Pike County lumber operation and it assets in October of 2011 for $4 million. The purchase included 43.44 acres of real estate in Glenwood.
FCC Equipment Financing had a long-running lawsuit for non-payment pending against Bean Lumber, Caddo Entergy and owner Curt Bean as well as a host of other defendants related to the struggling business. FCC was the only bidder when the company was sold by auction on the steps of the Pike County Courthouse.
Bean Lumber was first scheduled to be sold at auction in June of 2011 but 10 minutes prior to that sale an attorney representing the company filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy and the sale was cancelled.
Bean Lumber was once one of Pike County’s largest employers and Judge Baker said he was saddened to hear the bad news. “We were all hoping they’d get this all together soon and the sale would go through so we could get some people back to work,” he said.
Bean Lumber closed in 2007 but restarted in 2008 before financial troubles forced the business to shutdown again. The company once employed more than 125 workers at the mill and created hundreds of more jobs for area logging companies. Since Caterpillar purchased the company in 2011, the saw mill has been non-operational.
In a press release sent out last week, Hunt Forest Products stated, “Hunt and Caterpillar have been unable to reach an amicable solution in resolving some major issues. Hunt feels it is in their best interest to withdraw from further negotiations.”
Hunt human resource manager, George Keys, declined to comment further on the issues mentioned in the statement.
A source close to the negotiations said one of the issues likely involves a large ash pile located on the property. The pile reportedly covers two to three acres and is two to three stories high. The removal of the ash pile, which is a wood waste byproduct, could cost “at least $1 million,” according to the source.
Rex Lawrence of Glenwood, who is a member of the Southwest Arkansas Regional Coalition (formerly the Southwest Arkansas Regional Intermodal Authority), said it is his understanding that the ash pile is “not caustic” and is not deemed an environmental issue. “I want to say it was just a pile issue,” he said.
The day before the withdrawal announcement, Lawrence said he was on site looking at possible ways to have the ash pile removed. He said Hunt apparently wanted the pile removed within one year. “We thought we had an answer for the removal,” he said. “Then I get a phone call.”
Another issue that may have been involved in the withdrawal concerned right-of-way access to the now-closed railroad line, according to the source.
“Those are very minor but they may have been major to them,” Lawrence said of the right-of-way issue and the disposal of the ash pile. “Now, if there were other things, then I don’t know.”
Lawrence said he has talked to a Hunt Forest Products representative about the decision to abandon negotiations. “I told them, ‘We had ya’ll ready to come here and be our neighbor,’” he said. Lawrence was informed the company was “90 percent sure” the deal would go through, but “obviously something happened to change their mind.”
“The way he talked, they were pretty stern in their answer,” Lawrence said, adding that he hopes Caterpillar will soon begin courting another potential buyer.
Bank of Delight Chairman and CEO Darwin Hendrix, who sought out Hunt Forest Products as a potential buyer for the Pike County operation, said Monday the company’s decision to withdraw is a “big hit” to southwest Arkansas’s economy. Hendrix did credit Caterpillar for being a “good corporate citizen” in maintaining the Glenwood facility.
“They could have scrapped that mill – they’ve had offers to scrap it out, but they wanted to maintain the facility because they know the importance of making it operational in our area,” Hendrix said.

 

Coaches reflect on games; look at Scrapper facilities

By Jana Copeland
Leader staff
Sometimes understanding the past can help us appreciate and embrace the future. The atmosphere and encouragement that fans leave every game in the new Scrapper Arena is a legacy that will be remembered for future generations to come.
Dennis Horn, former Nashville Junior High boys and girls coach and senior high girls basketball coach, spent five years at the helm, 1967-1972. Those years were filled with many accomplishments for his junior high teams, especially. “At the time, the girls had just finished two undefeated seasons and the boys were 30-0.”
To say the least, the atmosphere in the newly completed Scrapper Arena was extremely peppy and involved. “The enthusiasm at the grand opening of the new HPER center reminded me of that in the gym that was new to us back then.”
Every coach has one or two games that really stick out to them throughout their careers. When Horn was asked, he answered, “Playing Helen Parker with her Ashdown Junior High team was always a challenge.” Nashville seemed to be able to beat everyone else, but that team. The Scrapperettes finally won when they got into senior high, though. “She was a great girls basketball coach,” Horn said of Parker.
Another team that always seemed to be a good matchup was Willie Click’s Delight team.
Horn has noticed some changes since his coaching years, including going from half-court play to playing full-court ball for girls. “It used to be 3 on 3, playing half-court. Now it’s 5 on 5 playing full-court. That is a major difference I have seen.”
Also, there were no three-point shots back then. “That has changed the boys and girls game tremendously over the years,” Horn said.
Along with Horn, Betty Floyd is another former Scrapperette basketball coach. She also coached in the 1967 gym from 1969-1979. “The gym was always so exciting, especially for the girls games! Everyone was there and cheered loud! The fans were very supportive.”
Floyd said that the most memorable game in her career would probably have to be the game in 1973 that they won state runners-up against Highland. “What I think is cool is that record still stands today,” Floyd said. “The trophy we received was placed into the impressive trophy case in the new HPER center.” She wants to make sure it stays in there until the record is either tied or broken. “I think this should motivate them to try to beat the record we had and try to do their best every game they play.”
Floyd had the first All-State Girls basketball player from Nashville, Charlene Kreul. Throughout her 10 years, Floyd had 33 All-District players, 3 All-Sate players, and 7 All-Star players. She was also the All-Star assistant coach in 1972 and was the head coach in 1973.
“The biggest difference I see in basketball is the change from half-court to full-court play and the 3 on 3 change to 5 on 5.” Floyd said that the reason the game changed to 5 on 5 was to help their girls get scholarships just like the boys did for college athletics. “In order for them to be able to play in college, they had to play like college players. That meant 5 on 5, full-court play,” Floyd said.
We all leave legacies. Let’s make sure that the legacy that we are building now in our new gymnasium is that of a true Scrapper.

 

Junior Scraperettes wins over Prescott

The junior Scrapperettes defeated Prescott 40-15 Jan. 6.
Asia Munn was the leading scorer for Nashville with 13 points, followed by Hannah White with 12, Kasey Hinds with 6, Kendall Kirchhoff with 4, Kaylea Carver and Bailey Denton with 2 each, and Allison Reeder with 1.
Nashville led 24-7 at halftime.
Kirchhoff led the team in rebounds with 7; Hinds had 6.
Munn recorded 4 steals, with 3 each for Kirchhoff and White.

Nashville to hits regional, state tournaments

Nashville will host four regional and state tournaments this spring, the Arkansas Activities Association announced Thursday.
The Class 4A South regional basketball tournament will be at Scrapper Arena Feb. 26-March 1.
The Class 4A South regional softball tournament will be at the Nashville City Park May 9, 10 and 12.
The Class 4A state track meet will be at Scrapper Stadium during the week of May 5. The date will be announced.
The Class 4A state baseball tournament will be at Wilson Park May 15-17.
The 4A South regional baseball tournament will be at Star City.
State 4A softball will be at Monticello.
State 4A basketball will be at Lonoke.

Scraperettes drop game to Arkadelphia

By John R. Schirmer
Leader staff
Missed free throws spelled defeat for the Scrapperettes Friday night as they lost to Arkadelphia 32-31 at Badger Gym.
The Scrapperettes and Lady Badgers fought it out in a defensive struggle through much of the game. Nashville led by two late in the contest, but Arkadelphia fought back, fouling the Scrapperettes and taking advantage of missed free throws.
The Lady Badgers went ahead to stay with 3 seconds left. Nashville put up a shot from mid-court but missed, and Arkadelphia escaped with the conference win.
Nashville hit only 1 of 12 free throws for 8 percent at Arkadelphia, according to Coach Ron Alexander. For the season, they’re 99 of 231 for 43 percent.
Kassidy Snowden led the Scrapperettes with 9 points against Arkadlephia. Shayla Wright was next with 7, followed by KeeKee Richardson with 6, Breonna Jefferson with 3 and Timaya Stewart and Bailey Walls with 2 each.
Jefferson made the Scrapperettes’ lone free throw.
The conference loss to Arkadelphia followed the Scrapperettes’ near-upset of Central Arkansas Christian Jan. 7. The Lady Mustangs are the state’s second-ranked team in the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette’s Class 4A poll.
The Scrapperettes shut out CAC 8-0 in the first quarter and led 16-10 at halftime before finally falling to the Lady Mustangs 35-30.
“Our defense played really well. We were in their face and showed a lot of intensity against CAC,” Alexander said. “We challenged almost every shot and shut down their transition.”
Snowden led the Scrapperettes with 18 points. Jefferson and Stewart had 4 each, followed by Wright and Latrice Wiley with 2 each.
Last week’s conference losses left the Scrapperettes at 1-3 in District 7-4A. “We put ourselves in a position to win every game,” Alexander said. “If we made less mistakes and made more free throws, we’d be 4-0 now. Instead, we’re tied for eighth in the conference. We’re 8-10 points out of first place.”
The Scrapperettes traveled to Ashdown Tuesday night. They will host top-ranked Malvern Friday at 6 p.m. at Scrapper Arena.
“We’re going to keep going and keep giving ourselves a chance to win. The free throws will fall eventually,” Alexander said.
Tournament
Foreman defeated the Scrapperettes 40-31 Saturday afternoon in semifinals of the Cossatot River Senior Tournament.
“That was the most lethargic we’ve played all year,” Alexander said of the team’s performance. Overall, “It was a total lack of effort.”
Wright, Richardson and Stewart had 8 points each against the Lady Gators.
“Bailey Walls gave us some quality minutes. Kiki and Shayla got after it Saturday,” Alexander said.
“We’ve got to score more, knock the free throws down and rebound.”

 

Scrappers fall to CAC, Arkadelphia

By John R. Schirmer
Leader staff
The Scrappers fell to Central Arkansas Christian and Arkadelphia in District 7-4A games last week.
Nashville and CAC were tied at 18-18 after the first half, but the Mustangs outscored the Scrappers 21-16 in the second half to take the win.
Arkadelphia led throughout the contest and won 73-37.
“We didn’t fare too well,” Coach Damon Williams said of last week’s games. “Against CAC, the defensive effort was there, but we struggled to score. We didn’t shoot well.”
In the Arkadelphia game, “Defensive intensity was a little lacking from the start. We’ve got to play better defense” in tough situations.
The Scrappers’ leading scorers in the CAC game were Brandon Shamrock and Cameron Alexander with 11 points each, followed by LaMichael Pettway with 7, Jamie Newton and Kevin Brazil with 2 each and Shavonte Norvell with 1.

Alexander was the leading scorer against Arkadelphia with 11, followed by Shamrock with 9 and Pettway with 6. Winland Ogden scored 4, Norvell had 3 and Corey Cooper and Newton added 2 each.

The Badgers turned in a stellar shooting performance, including nine 3-point shots.

Williams said the Scrappers must “take care of the ball. We had 30 turnovers against Arkadelphia. We need to cut that in half, at least.”

Despite the losses, “I’m still excited. There’s a lot of ability on this team. They’re buying in to what we’re doing. The key is playing hard. Our intensity level has dropped a little. That’s not acceptable,” Williams said.

“I thought we had turned the corner earlier. Now we’re in a big slide.”

The Scrappers played Ashdown Tuesday night and will host Malvern Friday in 7-4A games.

Career with NRCS ends after 32 years

AT RECEPTION. Clint Ramsey’s family joins him at the retirement reception Jan. 7. The group includes daughter Kristin Ramsey, wife Betty Ramsey, Clint Ramsey and daughter Jennifer Ramsey. Ramsey worked in the Nashville NRCS office for 29 years

By Emily Alexander
Leader staff
After nearly 36 years of service to the Natural Resource Conservation, a Nashville resident has retired.
Clint Ramsey was raised in Paul’s Valley, Okla. He graduated from Oklahoma State University in 1977 with a degree in Wildlife Management.
He’s been married to his wife Betty for 35 years and has two daughters, Kristin and Jennifer.
After graduating, he began working for what was then called the Soil Conservation Service (its name changed in the early 1990s) at Hamburg in 1978.
“When looking for a job, I wanted to work with fish and wildlife, but I couldn’t score high enough to get one because of veteran’s preference,” Ramsey said. “Soil Conservation was hiring and offered me a position. It was natural resources so I decided to work for them. It turns out that this agency has been very good to me, I have advanced more here than I could have at other places.”
After spending a year in Hamburg, he transferred to Danville and spent two years there. Then, he worked at Marshall for four years before finally being transferred to Nashville. He has spent the last 29 years working here.
“I was district conservationist in Howard and Pike Counties. I was in charge of carrying out all the Natural Resource Conservation programs in those two counties,” Ramsey said.
After working for three and a half decades, Ramsey says it’s time to move on.
“I’ve been working for 35 and a half years. I feel like it’s time to step aside and let younger employees come in,” he said.
As far as retirement plans go, Ramsey plans on staying in Nashville, and doing “whatever Clint and Betty want.”
He said, “I will miss working with the farmers and land users in Howard and Pike County, as well as my fellow employees, but I think it’s just time for me to do something else, to do what I want.”
A retirement reception was held for Ramsey on Jan. 7 at the Mine Creek Soil Conservation Office.

NCC accepting nominations for annual awards

Citizenship awards will be given, and new Nashville Chamber of Commerce officers will be introduced at the chamber’s annual awards banquet set for Monday, Feb. 3.
The banquet will begin at 6:30 p.m.at the Family Activities Center of the First Baptist Church in Nashville.
According to chamber manager Mike Reese, tickets are $15 each. There will be a drawing for a weekend trip for two, and the winner must be present at the banquet.
The chamber is also accepting nominations for annual awards. A nomination form is in this issue of the newspaper.
Nominations will be accepted for Man of the Year, Woman of the Year, the Orange and Black Education Award, and the Hometown Hero Award. The deadline for nominations is Tuesday, Jan. 28.
The chamber will also present business building awards for new and remodeled facilities.
New chamber president Mary Woodruff will formally succeed Wendy Haddan, and the board of directors for 2014 will be recognized.

Busy day in Howard County criminal court

Howard County’s new public defender was handed a dozen criminal cases, Wednesday, and he could possibly get one more from a busy day of court here.
Greg Vardaman, who took the position in November of 2013, was named to provide counsel in 10 criminal cases and three probation revocation cases, and was named the interim counsel in another case in which he may be relieved because of a possible conflict with representing another defendant.
On the bench for the regular day of court after year-end holidays was Judge Tom Cooper.
Not guilty, or not true, pleas were given by 13 defendants.
One pleaded ‘true’ and was sentenced.
James Burke Ewert, 57, white male, Nashville, pleaded true to failure to meet the terms of his probation on a Jan. 6, 2010, conviction for terroristic threatening, a class D felony. He was sentenced to an extension of one year of his probation, or until he makes all payments required by the original sentence. Ewert was represented by the public defender.
Not true pleas were given by defendants in two probation revocation cases.
A not true was given by Keith Franklin, 27, white male, Nashville, charged with failure to meet the terms of his probation on a Jan. 28, 2009, conviction for residential burglary and theft of property, class D and B felonies, respectively. His trial was set for April 23. He is represented by the public defender.
The other not true plea was given by Dontarius Armstrong, 21, black male, Nashville, who is also facing a current criminal charge. Armstrong is represented by the public defender. Armstrong is charged with failure to meet the terms of his June 13, 2011, probation on a conviction for residential burglary and theft of property, both class B felonies.
Armstrong’s current criminal charge is for class D felony theft by receiving. The probation revocation hearing will be held on April 9, the same date for hearing motions on his latter charge.
Brian Smalley, 58, black male, 224 Russell, Nashville, pleaded not guilty to a class D felony charge of possession of a controlled substance. He will be represented by the public defender, and pretrial motions will be heard April 9. His bond is $10,000.
A not guilty plea was given by Gage R. Gonzales, 21, white male, Mt. Pleasant, Texas, charged with possession of a controlled substance, class D felony. He was assigned to the public defender. Pretrial motions to be heard April 9.
Michael Chance Hale, 22, white male, 601 S. Washington, Nashville, pleaded not guilty to residential burglary (accomplice), class B felony, and felon in possession of a firearm, class D felony. He was assigned to the public defender. His bond was set at $25,000 and his trial date was set for April 14.
A not guilty plea was given by Delonte Armstrong, 20, black male, 410 W. Henderson, Nashville, charged with possession of a controlled substance with purpose of delivery — enhanced by proximity to a school — a class C felony; possessing a defaced firearm, class D felony; simultaneous possession of drugs and firearms, a class Y felony; and criminal use of a prohibited weapon, class D felony. The public defender was appointed to represent Armstrong.
Louis Richard, 50, black male, 216 Graves Chapel Road, Lockesburg (near Mineral Springs) will have an April 15 trial on a class C felony charge of second degree forgery. He will be represented by the public defender. A trial condition of bond is that he make payment of $1,175 owed on old cases.
Christopher Edwards, 24, black male, 622 S. Front, Nashville, pleaded not guilty to a class D felony charge of possession of controlled substance, Schedule VI drugs. Pretrial motions will be heard March 5. He is represented by the public defender.
A not guilty plea was given by Adrian A. Jordan, 26, black male, Ozan, charged with possession of a controlled substance, Schedule VI drugs, a class D felony. He is represented by the public defender. Pretrial motions will be heard March 5.
Anthony Y. Reed, 24, black male, 1168 Dog Town Road, De Queen, pleaded not guilty to charges of possession of methamphetamine or cocaine with purpose of sale, class A felony, and simultaneous possession of drugs and firearms, class Y felony, and possession of a controlled substance, class A felony. The public defender was appointed as his counsel and a date of April 9 was set for pretrial motions. Bond was set at $25,000.
Christopher A. Moore, 28, black male, 1168 Dog Town Road, De Queen, pleaded not guilty to a class A felony charge of possession of methamphetamine or cocaine with purpose of sale, and a class Y felony charge of simultaneous possession of drugs and firearms. His counsel will be the public defender who will be relieved by LaJeana Jones if there is a conflict with representation with another defendant. Moore’s bond was set at $35,000. Pretrial motions will be heard April 9.
A not guilty plea was given by Shawn R. Gilbert, 38, white male, Nashville, who will be represented by the public defender on charges of residential burglary, class B felony, theft of property, class C felony, and felon in possession of a firearm, class D felony.  His bond was set at $25,000 and a date of April 9 was set for pretrial motions.
One defendant, Audie Milton Echols, 49, white male, 2459 Cornbridge Road, Nashville, told the judge he did not yet have an attorney, and was told to report back next week.

 

Mine Creek Revelations: Deputize Me

THERE SEEMS TO BE some public support these days for mandatory drug-testing of persons who apply for unemployment benefits or other public assistance.
In fact, such a law was popularly enacted in Florida, but a Supreme Court (either Florida’s or the nation’s — I don’t know which) shot the local law down as being unconstitutional. Made too much sense, I suppose. I don’t want to humiliate or penalize persons who are in unfortunate situations, but neither do I want my tax dollars to enable any illegal or anti-social activity.
But still, mandatory drug testing something that’s probably coming. I believe we’ll finally begin to see such legislation appear in other states, even Arkansas.
Something else that might be coming is legalization of marijuana. It’ll happen for no other reason than M-O-N-E-Y in the form of business income. Witness all the activity in Colorado when it became legal there a few weeks ago.
Bear with me, I am going somewhere with this.
Lots of people tell me that if the marijuana measure gets on the Arkansas ballot, it’ll pass. I’m not so sure, but I think we should be prepared anyway.
If the law passes and marijuana becomes legal, I guess it would be sold from state-licensed emporiums, like out in Colorado. That way the state could pick up a few bucks by taxing the sale. And by requiring permits to sell the weed.
It seems to me — and I have instructed my local state senator on my feelings — that if the marijuana law passes, we need to have a law so that anyone who tries to buy marijuana should be drug tested first.
Doesn’t that make sense?
●-●-●
MY PET PEEVES — ‘J Turns’ and ‘Sagging.’
In the district court report printed this week, one 21-year-old gentleman was fined $100 plus costs for wearing his pants so low that his undies were showing. It cost him a total of $145.
I don’t see so many ‘J Turns’ anymore, so maybe drivers are catching on. Let me repeat what has been written here earlier: It is against the law in the city of Nashville to make a J Turn in the downtown area, and it is against the law in Nashville to wear your pants below your hiney.
However, Friday morning someone in a red Chevy Avalanche made a J Turn in front of me in the 100 block of North Main Street.
I am going to ask the chief of police to deputize me so I can give out tickets to dangerous offenders such as this.
The problem with me being deputized is that I might have to give myself a ticket for making an ‘Editor’s Rolling Stop,’ a harmless traffic manuever which I, at one time, thought was okay for important people like editors to use when they were on their way to do something important. You know, stuff that editors do. Of course, an Editor’s Rolling Stop is not nearly as offensive as a J Turn. Trust me.
I was stunned to learn that the Editor’s Rolling Stop isn’t actually legal. Worse, I discovered that police would quietly overlook a state senator who occasionally made an Editor’s Rolling Stop even though the aforementioned senator wasn’t qualified by being important like an actual editor.
If I were deputized I’d probably have to give myself a warning ticket and a stern caution.
The state senator wouldn’t be so lucky. His unauthorized use of the Editor’s Rolling Stop would cost $145 in district court, just like the J Turners and Saggers.
Justice is blind. I heard that somewhere.
●-●-●
MY MISTEAK.
A caption under a pic last week erroneously stated that the coldest temperature ever recorded here was zero degrees on two occasions.
WORNG! See my ‘mea culpa’ elsewhere in this issue of the newspaper, along with a little more information about the gathering of ‘official’ weather data for the National Weather Service.
●-●-●
WEIGHT WATCHERS.
Weight Watchers meets in the activities building at Ridgeway Baptist Church out on Peachtree Street. Weigh-in begins at 5, with lashing and flogging to follow.
At weigh-in Monday evening, I was lashed after the scales lied and said I had gained XX pounds. How disappointing after last week’s great weight loss of 0.6 pounds. The truth is that I richly deserved the upward move of the figures on the digital scales, but I’m going to continue to try to do better. Pass the nachos, please.
Two friends of mine were determined to lose weight and get into better shape for the new year, so they went and signed up at a local exercise joint.
“Have you lost any weight?” I asked. Their answer was “Nope” but it turns out that they hadn’t actually gone back and taken actual exercise.
One of them, however, did say that he had driven past the health club on numerous occasions and had focused his thoughts on the healthful benefits of exercise. They were both depressed that they hadn’t lost weight and were also pretty mad about false advertising.
●-●-●
THINGS I LEARNED from opening email: “Months that begin on a Sunday will always have a ‘Friday the 13th.’
●-●-●
 HE SAID: “Honesty is something you can’t wear out.” Waylon Jennings, musician
●-●-●
SHE SAID: “I only use my sick days for hangovers and soap opera weddings.” Kate O’Brien, novelist
●-●-●
SWEET DREAMS, Baby

Obituaries

Malinda Ann
Webb Stone
Malinda Ann Webb Stone, 86, of Murfreesboro, passed away on Monday, Jan. 6, 2014 in Prescott, Ark.
She was born on Jan. 17, 1927 in Ozan, Ark.,  to Goodlett Webb and Verna (Hunt) Webb.
Malinda was a librarian at the Pike County Public Library;  hostess at Latimer Funeral Home; and member of the Murfreesboro Church of Christ.
In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by her husband, Glen Stone.
Survivors include: three daughters, Myrna Holder and husband, Charles, of Murfreesboro, Tenn., Kay Haynie and husband, Earl, of Prescott, Becky Arnold of Bearden, Ark.; one son, Richard Stone and wife, Peggy, of Murfreesboro, Ark.; nine grandchildren, Lori Holder Maynard, Scott Arnold, Robin Dean Henderson, Jon Holder, Brian Arnold, Rebecca Holder Griffin, Melissa Dean, Lance Stone, and Nathan Stone; 10 great-grandchildren, Lane Arnold, Brittany Arnold Hall, Ben Maynard, Major Henderson, Parker Dean, Hunter Griffin, Garrett Maynard, Paxton Holder, Maddox Holder, and Maci Henderson; two great-great grandchildren, Braydon Hall, and Brantley Arnold; one sister, Tillie Terrell of Murfreesboro; one sister-in-law, June Haltom of Texarkana, Texas;  a number of nephews, nieces, and a host of friends.
Services were Thursday, Jan. 9, 2014 at 2:00 p.m. at Latimer Funeral Home Chapel in Murfreesboro with Tommy Mounts, Rob Evans, and Charles Holder officiating. Burial followed in Academy Cemetery near Nathan under the direction of Latimer Funeral Home, Murfreesboro.
Visitation was Wednesday, Jan. 8, 2014 from 4-7 p.m. at the funeral home.
 You may send an online sympathy message to http://www.latimerfuneralhome.com/.
Melba Bounds
Melba Bounds, age 74 of Nashville, Ark., passed away, Monday, Jan. 6, 2014 in Nashville.
She was born June 28, 1939 in Doyle community to the late Coy Lee and Angie Rike Hutson. She was a member of First Baptist Church in Nashville. Melba worked to promote gospel music all of her life. Starting with Stamps Music Company and Stamps Baxter Music (Dallas, Texas) and Vaughn Publishing (Cleveland, Tenn.). While serving as president of Tennessee, Texas, Arkansas, and Louisiana State Singing Conventions and the National Singing Conventions which she brought to Nashville, Ark.
She was preceded in death by her husband, Charles Bounds, 12 years ago.
Survivors include: three sisters, Dolores Davis and husband, Clark, of Nashville, Ark., Pat Boor and husband, Randy, of Nashville, Ark., Shelia Kinslow and husband, Ken, of Nashville, Ark.; one niece, Tonya Thomas and husband, Mark, of Cabot, Ark.; three nephews, Randy Ray and wife, Sharron, of Magnolia, Ark., Terry Ray and wife, Becky, of Nashville, Ark., Kory Kinslow of Denton, Texas; and a host of other family and friends.
Services were Thursday, Jan. 9, 2014 at 2 p.m. at First Baptist Church in Nashville with Kevin Sartin and David Blase officiating. Interment followed in Avery’s Chapel Cemetery. The family received friends on Wednesday night from 5 to 7 p.m. at Nashville Funeral Home. Memorials may be made to First Baptist Church or the charity of your choice. You may send the family an online sympathy message to www.nashvillefh.com
Inez Marie Manasco
Inez Marie Manasco, 98, of Nashville, died Friday, Jan. 10, 2014 in Texarkana, Texas.
She was born Dec. 30, 1915 in Bonnerdale, Ark., the daughter of the late Commie and Renna Lambert Keith.
She was a member of the Umpire Seventh Day Adventist Church.
She was preceded in death by her husband, Wingo Manasco; two daughters, Sharon Pennington and Phyllis Manasco; and a son, Charles Manasco.
Survivors include: two daughters, Carolyn Wakefield of Nashville, and Fern Linville of Umpire; two sisters, Ovalee Anderson and Helen Wiseman; also grandchildren, great-grandchildren and great-great-grandchildren.
Funeral services were at 2 p.m. Monday, Jan. 13, 2014 in the Wilkerson Funeral Home Chapel in Dierks, with Ken Wiseman and Gordon Pendergrass officiating. Burial followed in the Galena Cemetery in Umpire.
The family received friends from 4-6 p.m., Sunday, Jan. 12, at the funeral home in Dierks.
Register on-line at wilkersonfuneralhomes.com.

Catching coyotes in Delight

That's No Pet. John Stone of Delight with a big coyote trapped in the Delight area.

By John Balch
Leader staff
DELIGHT – At first glance, the picture looks just like the caption says: “Ol’ cuz got him a pet.”
Look again, and one sees that “cuz” (John Stone) is actually cradling a large live coyote.
Cousins John and Beebo Stone, both of Delight, have been trapping live coyotes for about five years and Beebo estimates they have caught around 300 during that time. They sell the live animals to an area foxpen for $50 to $75 each.
To trap and sell live coyotes, hunters must have both a regular Arkansas Game and Fish Commission trapping permit and a live fox and coyote permit.
Beebo said he and his cousin usually start catching coyotes around Christmas time and stop in February. Last  year, they caught 55 coyotes.
“We’re getting pretty good at it,” Beebo said.
The animals are lured in with common dog food and then caught in cable snares. A “catch pole” with coated cable is then used to get the animal under control. (That is why in the above mentioned picture it appears John is casually holding the coyote – the catch pole is still attached but hidden in the picture).
The two hunters received some minor training when they first started, learning a few tricks of the trade such as how to set the snares to “miss non-target animals.”
But, Beebo said, there was a lot of trial and error involved.
“Yeah, I’ve been bit four times,” he said, explaining once the animal is in the snare, cable-cutters are needed to free the snare. “That’s my job, and that puts me up at the head,” he said. Cousin John works the other end of the catch pole.
The coyotes are loaded into dog boxes and transported approximately 60 miles to an area foxpen.
A foxpen is defined by the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission as “any fenced enclosure in which red fox, gray fox or coyote are chased by dogs for pleasure or for field trial purposes.”
An AGFC report states that coyotes are both beneficial and “controversial.” Packs of the animals consume large numbers of rodents, scavenge for dead animals and remove crippled and diseased deer from the deer herd. But they also prey upon “game animals and domestic animals, such as cats, dogs and occasionally poultry and other livestock.” Ranchers have reported seeing coyotes stalking expectant cows, waiting to immediately take the newborn calves away from its mother.
The coyote was originally found in the more open areas of western Arkansas. “But with changing agricultural practices, such as clearing of timberlands and creation of more open lands, the coyote extended its range tot he central part of the state by the early 1950s and over the entire state by the early 1960s,” according to AGFC. The animals are now common in every Arkansas county and are prevalent in the Ouachita region of the state.

 

NCC president already at helm; to be recognized at banquet

Mary Woodruff

A total of 68 citizens have served as presidents of the Nashville Chamber of Commerce since its organization in 1921. The 69th is already in office but will officially be recognized in February at the chamber’s annual awards banquet.
The incoming president is Mary Woodruff, owner of The Printshop. Four other women -Sheila Kreul, Dena Tollett, Tina Chism and Wendy Haddan – have served as president.
Five persons have served more than one term as chamber president. They are the founding board president, “Peach King” Bert Johnson, who served from 1921-24 and in 1931, and David Pile, Ralph Wilson, Deb Kinkade and Price Kreul. Kinkade was also the first woman to serve as president – 1997.
Although the chamber was organized here in 1921, there were apparently some years in which it was inactive.
Presidents and their years include:
1921-24 Bert Johnson
1925-30 George E. Bell
1931 Bert Johnson
1938-39 Glen Wallace
1940-41 Rex Ramsay
1942 Cecil Callaham
1944 Forest Wilson
1945 R.M. Stuart
1946 Bob McClure
1947 Boyd Tackett, H.A. Firmin
1948 Nathan Coulter
1949 Dave Ryan
1950 Hearn Latimer
1953 Frank Elder
1954 Louis “Swampy” Graves
1955 Bobby Steel
1956 Ralph Wilson
1957 Jack Rorex
1960 Jay Toland
1961 Deward Sharp
1962 Lester Stueart
1963 Neely Cassady
1964 Don Coulter
1965 Bernie Kreul
1966 David Pile
1967 Edgar McCrary
1968 Pat Honeycutt
1969 Al Backus
1970 Ralph Wilson
1971 Ronny Blakely
1972 James Chandler
1973 Dale Hamilton
1974 Edwin Dale
1975 Bruce Anthony
1976 Joe Branch
1977 Pete Gathright
1978 David Boden, Roy Reaves
1979 David Pile
1980 Kenneth Wilson
1981 Louie Graves
1982 Price Kreul
1983 Rick Castleberry
1984 Herschell Teague
1985 Mike Reese
1986 Mike Reese
1987 Larry Teague
1988 Dennis McBride
1989 Wendell Hoover
1990 Jerry Jacobs
1991 Sammie Cox
1992 Don Cooley
1993 Greg Tate
1994 Mike Kinkade
1995 Rob Hainen
1996 Donnie Parrish
1997 Deb Kinkade
1998 Roger Cox
1999 Roger Cox, Deb Kinkade
2000 Price Kreul
2001 Sheila Kreul
2002 Floyd Clark, Jr.
2003 Don White, Sr.
2004 Tina Chism
2005 Ronny Woods
2006 Earl Sanders
2007 Cary Lott
2008 Charlie Peek
2009 John Gray
2010 Rusty Hagler
2011 Dena Tollett
2012 Tim Pinkerton
2013 Wendy Haddan
2014 Mary Woodruff
Four persons will be elected to fill open spots on the chamber board of directors. Chamber manager Mike Reese said that he was in the process of filling out a ballot of 10 persons who would agree to serve, and that the ballot would go out to chamber members as soon as the ballot was filled. He said that incoming board members could include persons who are re-elected and some who have never before served.
Board members whose terms have expired include Tim Pinkerton, Sandra Jones, Dena Tollett and Fred Hintze.

 

Mine Creek Revelations: To Pikeville

A SATURDAY ROAD TRIP.
It was high time for me to ‘run up’ to Pikeville and make sure everything was alright on Lake Greeson. And besides, our area was supposedly in for a stretch of real winter weather during which I might not want to get far from the recliner and the fireplace if I had a fireplace.
I tricked the Navigator into going with me and we set off early in the afternoon under dreary skies.
It had been well over a year since I drove ‘up’ to Pikeville which — for those of you who do not go to ‘the lake’ — is a pleasant wooded peninsula on the west side not far from Narrows Dam. It’s not far as the crow flies, but by road it’s an adventure.
It’s never been easy to get to Pikeville. Roads were graded occasionally by the Corps of Engineers in the past, but even after it had been graded as smooth as they could get it, the road stillmcrawled over big sharp boulders which eliminated cars and other vehicles that were built too close to the ground. Also, even in August there some mudholes covering the width of the road, and those muddy waters frightened away some motorists.
I didn’t mind the bumpy, muddy trip because it kept foreigners from taking over one of our Arkansas attractions.
But the Fed cutbacks have really changed the place. The Corps (or someone) has even taken down the wooden signs which formerly helped you stay on the right road. I’ve made the trip enough times so that I could find the way, but in all honesty this time I did catch myself wondering which way to turn at some of the forks.
In addition to removal of signs, the Corps has eliminated the occasional road-grading. Every sharp boulder in the road is now pointed up at your oil pan. Those boulders were there before the road was so they ain’t going away. Plus, the woods have encroached enough so that it’s almost a one-lane road.
Every time I came to a mudhole, Saturday, I worried cowardly whether it might have a firm gravel bottom or a — gulp — treacherous muddy one.
On the way in, we met four ATVs riding in a group. They were on their way out. Other than that, there was no hint of humans. By the time we got to a picnic table overlooking the gray water, the sun was already getting low in the sky. From the picnic table we could look ‘up’ the lake and see Chimney Rock; or look the other direction and see the dam. Brrrrr. The water looked so cold!
Our stay at Pikeville was brief because I didn’t want to challenge mudholes or the faintly-remembered road forks in the dark.
The Navigator promised that she would get out and push me out of a mudhole if we got stuck. Somehow that didn’t make me feel better. I’m not saying she’d lie.
When we reached the dam I noticed again the red sign that warns motorists that stopping is not allowed for the next quarter mile.
Really, as if some dynamite-laden terrorist would read the sign and obey (“Achmed, we can’t blow up the dam today because we might get a parking ticket.”)
Even in the drab of winter, our state is magnificent. For one thing, the piney woods smell wonderful. Driving down those roads, the scenery is salted with occasional clumps of some bush with red berries mixed among the evergreens.
And I am forever hopeful of surprising a bear or lion crossing the road. Haven’t done that yet, but I do frequently come across deer or turkeys.
Saturday, my encounter with a fine deer was too close for comfort. I’m sure  he said the same thing.
●-●-●
THINGS I LEARNED from reading email: “Why does a round pizza come in a square box?”
●-●-●
WEIGHT WATCHERS. Not great news this week although I did managed somehow to lose 0.6 lbs. putting a halt to the rebound of my weight over the last few weeks.
I can think of a few things that contributed to that modest rebound: Thanksgiving, Christmas, New Years. Also, when restricted to my home during cold bouts I tend to graze. It’s a hard habit to break. But I intend to stay with WW and get my lying digital scales headed in the right way again.
In the aggregate, I have lost a little over seven pounds. At one point I had lost nearly11 lbs.
Weight Watchers meets in the activities building at Ridgeway Baptist Church out on Peachtree Street.
Weigh-in begins at 5, with lashing and flogging to follow.
●-●-●
HE SAID: “The best years of your life are the ones in which you decide your problems are your own. You do not blame them on your mother, the ecology, or the president. You realize that you control your own destiny.” Albert Ellis, psychologist
●-●-●
SHE SAID: “Self esteem comes from doing something and accomplishing something.” Shari Lewis, entertainer
●-●-●
SWEET DREAMS, Baby

Nashville School District nears order for Chromebooks; NHS project awaits state approval

By John R. Schirmer
Leader staff
With school back in session following the Christmas break, Superintendent Doug Graham expects a number of projects to pick up speed.
“I hope January is a busy month,” Graham said Monday afternoon.
One of the top priorities will be ordering 1-1 devices for local students. Graham, other administrators, teachers and board members have discussed the devices for months in an effort to find one which best serves students and will be usable for state testing in the spring.
The choice appears to be Chromebooks, Graham told the school board last month.
As the new semester begins, the district is set to make the purchase. “I sure expect to order the devices in January,” Graham said Monday.
Completion of the district’s facilities improvement project is also at the top of the list for 2014. The final phase will focus on high school.
“We’re waiting for plans to be approved by the state for the NHS work,” Graham said. “The architect wants it to coincide with a late-spring groundbreaking so that most of the work can be done in the summer. We’re anxiously awaiting state approval.”
The district approved about $15 million for the entire facilities project, which began in 2011. The construction budget “is in good shape to get things completed. We anticipate $2 1/2 to $3 million” for the work at high school, Graham said.
The project includes enclosing the courtyard and turning it into a commons area and dining room, renovation of plumbing and electrical work on the south end of the 1967 building, reworking the roof on the south end, and renovating the administrative offices. Graham also wants to work on making floor tile and classroom paint colors match throughout the building.
“We’ll do as much as the budget allows. If we can’t do it all, we’ll prioritize,” Graham said.
Portions of the facilities project which are already completed include renovation of much of the high school building, a 7-classroom addition at high school, renovation of the media center at high school, new cafeteria and media center at junior high, and construction of Scrapper Arena.
The cost breakdown so far includes $3 million for the completed high school work, $8 million for the arena and junior high project, leaving about $3 million for the remainder of the high school renovation, along with a cushion for other expenses.
The deadline is near for another project. “Jan. 9 is the deadline for bids for hosting [regional and state] basketball and spring sports tournaments,” Graham said.
The Arkansas Activities Association will meet Jan. 16 to announce the sites for each classification.
“We will be there in force to try to secure regional and state bids,” Graham said. Nashville will submit proposals to host basketball, baseball and softball tournaments. Track is “pending,” according to Graham.
Scrapper Arena has already been named the site for the District 7-4A basketball tournament.
The newly opened facility seats 1,800 and meets all AAA requirements for regionals and state, according to the district.

Local school recognized, rewarded for test results

By John R. Schirmer
Leader staff
Test scores in the Nashville School District have been ranked among the top 20 percent in Arkansas, according to the state Department of Education. As a result, the district has been awarded $47,435 through a new state program, according to Superintendent Doug Graham.
“The state has set aside school recognition and reward program money for schools with high student performance and growth and for high schools with high graduation rates,” Graham said.
Nashville’s scores on 2013 state testing placed the district in the top 20 percent in the state and qualified the local schools for the recognition program.
State guidelines say the money may be used for the following purposes: non-recurring bonuses, non-recurring expenses for educational equipment or materials, and employment of a temporary person to work on student performance.
A committee comprised of a principal, teacher and parent will decide how to use the money.
“We appreciate the funding and will try to wisely use the $47,435,” Graham said. “I’m more proud of our test scores. Our teachers and students have been working mighty hard on scores. Being in the top 20 percent puts us in good company.”

MLK Jr. event set for Monday

Area churches and the public are invited to participate in the community’s seventh annual Martin Luther King, Jr., celebration which is set for Monday, Jan. 20.
The event will be at the New Light CME Church, 1301 S. Mill, Nashville, and the program will begin at 6 p.m.
The public is also invited to nominate a citizen for the annual Alston Award, given for community service. To place a nomination, or for more information, contact Jimmie White, 451-1090, or Bonnie Haislip, 200-2683.

Nashville senator to have key role in fiscal session

Senator Larry Teague

By Emily Alexander
Leader staff
The third fiscal session of the Arkansas Legislature will start Feb. 11, after a series of budget hearings starting next Tuesday, Jan. 14 and continuing through Jan. 16. During the budget hearings, only the six big agencies will be addressed including education, higher education, health department, Department of Human Services, corrections and community corrections.
“The voters of the state passed a referred amendment to the Constitution in 2008 saying we’d have a fiscal session every other year,” Sen. Larry Teague of Nashville said. “The session can only deal with budget matters unless 2/3 of both bodies vote to open it up. There’s a lot of people who are wanting to open it up this year, but I remain opposed. I feel if it’s something that urgent, we should have a special session to deal with that.”
The key issues with the fiscal session involve money. The governor provides a forecast every year on how much money the state will have and where the state will spend its money. According to Teague, the governor’s main priorities generally include education, higher education and corrections. The decision of whether or not the state will renew funding for private option insurance will also be addressed.
As chairman of the Budget Committee, Teague has a large involvement in all the budget hearings and the budget committee meetings.
“Most issues come in, we pass them, and go on. Education gets more money because of adequacy. We have usually three weeks to do this because the constitution says we get 30 days and we can expand for 15 days. If the governor chooses to go back and veto anything, the three weeks gives us a chance to go back and look at that,” Teague said.
The issue of Lt. Gov. Mark Darr’s possible impeachment due to ethics violations in his 2012 campaign will likely be brought up at the session.
Teague said, “I believe it’ll all work itself out. He just needs time to figure out where he’s at and what to do. He should get time. There’s a lot of folks calling for his resignation, but I’m not one of them.”
This year also marks the last for Arkansas Gov. Mike Beebe, whose term will expire. Teague says he’s sad to see him go.
“I like the governor a lot. He’s a dear friend of mine. He’s a good man, and he and his chief of staff know more about state government than anyone involved. He’s given about 40 years of service,” he said.
Teague is excited about getting the fiscal session underway and getting this year’s budgets figured out.
“In a final analysis, I hope to go in, take care of business, and get out. I don’t see anything that will require extraordinary discussion. I feel the people passed this for us to go in and do our work, tweak what needs to be tweaked and go home, and that’s what I hope to do,” said Teague.

Obituaries

Irene Penix Luck
Irene Penix Luck was born March 26, 1912 in Claiburn Parish, La., and died Dec. 31, 2013 in Nashville, Ark., at the age of 101. Her parents were Patrick Cleveland Penix and Minnie Mae Sanders.
She was proceeded in death by her parents; her husband, Frederick ‘Fred’ H. Luck; five sisters and two brothers.
Irene was an athlete in high school and attended business school in Jackson, Miss., while living with her uncle, a judge, and his wife. In 1950, Fred and Irene moved to Nashville and opened Luck’s Seed and Garden Center where they worked until retirement in 1975. She later worked at Mine Creek Jewelry Store for several years. Irene was a charter member of the Terra Firma Garden Club and spent many years working to help beautify Nashville. She attended the First Baptist Church and served on several committees. She loved to work in her yard and to travel.
Irene is survived by her son, Mike Luck and wife Juanita of Oveida, Fla., her daughter, Pat Bolt, and husband Marvin of Dallas, Texas; grandchildren Dinah Luck of Brooklyn, NY, Patrick Luck and wife Laura of Columbus, Ga.; and a great-granddaughter, Elizabeth Gail Luck of Columbus, Ga.
Funeral was under the direction of Latimer Funeral Home in Nashville at 2 p.m. Tuesday afternoon at the First Baptist Church. A visitation with the family was at 1 p.m. at the church before the funeral.
You may send an online sympathy message to http://www.latimerfuneralhome.com/.
Marjorie Daniell Pearson
Marjorie Daniell Pearson, 94, died Monday Dec. 27, 2013, at Windsor Care Center in Terrell, Texas.
She was born Feb. 7, 1919, in Nashville, to the late Louis and Lottie Austin-Wakefield.
She was preceded in death by two brothers, Coy and Lewis; five sisters, Evelyn McGavock, Dorothy Tucker, Virginia Duffie, Billie Wakefield and Jimmie Martinez.
Survivors include: her son, Brent Daniell of Dallas; a brother, Joe Wakefield of Weslaco, Texas; and a grandchild.
Arrangements by Coker-Matthews Funeral Home, Greenville, Texas.
Phillip Emory
‘Bo’ Clark
Phillip Emory “Bo” Clark passed away Jan. 2, 2014.
Bo spent his life on the beloved farm in Unity Community on Buck Range Road except the 4 years of World War II when he served our country in the Solomon Islands in the South Pacific.
Bo was born July 7, 1923 to the late Phillip Marcellus and Sarah Viola Clark. He is survived by his son, Phillip C. Clark and wife, Linda, of Texas; a daughter, Rebecca “Becky” Stephenson and husband, Don, of Rhode Island. Bo is also survived by several grandchildren and many great grandchildren in Texas, Arkansas, and Georgia. Bo is also survived by sisters Delsie Lee “Bob” Castleman and husband, Jan, of Nashville, Agatha Mitchell of Eldorado and Patricia “Pat” Reed of Texarkana. Bo was predeceased by brothers Marcellus Clark and Percy “Abe” Clark of Nashville, and sisters Nylotis Webb and Quintilla “Nance” Morgan of Stevens, Verdell “Petey” Jones of Eldorado and Texarkana, and Ruby Jones of Texarkana; also a brother Jimmy who passed away as an infant.
Bo loved his cows and farm, and also spent many years in his career with the Street Department of the City of Nashville and before that, the Road Department of Howard County.
Bo’s life will be honored in a graveside service on Saturday, Jan. 11 at 10 a.m. at the Unity Baptist Church cemetery on Buck Range Road. Please no flowers as Bo would have preferred and give to a charity of your choice in his memory if you choose.
Steve Marvin Woodruff
Steve Marvin Woodruff, 57, of Texarkana, Texas, died Jan. 2, 2014 at his residence.
He was born Dec. 19, 1956, in Nashville. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army.
Survivors include: his mother, Sharon Woodruff of Richardson, Texas; a son, Lucas Woodruff of Ashdown; a daughter, Candis Williams of Missoula, Mont.; two brothers, Woody Woodruff and Shane Woodruff, both of Texarkana; a sister, Bonnie Barron of Richardson, Texas; also a granddaughter.
A memorial service was held at 3 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 5, 2014, at Texarkana Funeral Home, Texarkana, Ark., with Rev. Wallace Edgar officiating.
Melba Bounds
Funeral arrangements are pending for Melba Bounds, 76, of Nashville who died Jan. 6, 2014. Services will be at 2 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 9, 2014 at First Baptist Church in Nashville under the direction of Nashville Funeral Home.
Malinda Stone
Funeral arrangements are pending with Latimer Funeral Home for Malinda Stone, 86, of Murfreesboro who died Monday, Jan. 6, 2014.
Morgan Vaughn
Morgan Vaughn, 75 of Ozan, died Jan. 1, 2014 in Texarkana.
He was born Oct. 6, 1938 in Center Point.
Survivors include: his wife, Vickie Vaughn; a sister, Bobbie Haney; five daughters, four sons, 10 step-children; also grandchildren and great-grandchildren.
Funeral services will be Sunday, Jan. 12, 2014, at the Sunset Church of Christ in Nashville at 2 p.m. under the direction of Nashville Funeral Home.
The family will receive friends at the funeral home on Saturday evening from 5-7.

Junior Scrapperettes win over Prescott

The junior Scrapperettes defeated Prescott 40-15 Jan. 6.
Asia Munn was the leading scorer for Nashville with 13 points, followed by Hannah White with 12, Kasey Hinds with 6, Kendall Kirchhoff with 4, Kaylea Carver and Bailey Denton with 2 each, and Allison Reeder with 1.
Nashville led 24-7 at halftime.
Kirchhoff led the team in rebounds with 7; Hinds had 6.
Munn recorded 4 steals, with 3 each for Kirchhoff and White.

Scrappers drop two in Dual State Tournament

JUNCTION CITY – The Scrappers led at halftime but fell in two games last week at the Dual State Tournament in Junction City.
Nashville led Camden Harmony Grove and Crossett at the half before losing both games.
“We played well at times, but we couldn’t finish,” Coach Damon Williams said. “We forgot how to rebound in the second half in both of them.
Harmony Grove took a narrow 65-62 victory over the Scrappers in the opening game Dec. 31, and Crossett won by nine, 52-43, on Jan. 2.
“We gave up 36 points in the second half against Harmony Grove, and we gave up 36 in the second half against Crossett,” Williams said.
Brandon Shamrock led the Scrappers in scoring against Harmony Grove with 28 points, followed by Cameron Alexander with 23.
Alexander made a 3-point shot against the Hornets; Shamrock made 3 from 3-point range.
In the Crossett game, LaMichael Pettway was the leading scorer with 14 points; Alexander had 13 and Shamrock had 12
The Scrappers led the Eagles 29-16 at halftime but were outscored 36-14 in the second half.
“Against Crossett in the first half, we played as well as we have all season. In the second half, we didn’t,” Williams said.  “Crossett didn’t make any huge adjustments in the second half.”
The Eagles had 22 offensive rebounds for the game, while the Scrappers had 23 rebounds total, including offensive and defensive.
Jalen Hudson had 33 points for Crossett.
The Eagles “shot till they made it,” Williams said.
“It was a great tournament,” according to Williams. “We saw some tremendous teams. It was a good test for us.”

Photos: Nashville vs. CAC

Voters now required to show photo ID at polls

PHOTO ID EQUIPMENT. Howard County Clerk Brenda Washburn shows the camera and device needed to accommodate Act 595 of 2013 which requires photo ID be shown at the polls.

By John Balch
Leader staff
Arkansans going to the polls this year will be required to show photo identification before casting votes, according to new legislation that went into effect Jan. 1.
Act 595 of 2013 requires all voters to present acceptable photo identification, but registered voters who do not have the proper photo identification can get a free ID card issued by their home county clerk’s office.
If a person is unable to provide ID at the polls, that voter can cast a “provisional ballot,” which will be counted if the voter returns to the “county clerk or county election commission by noon the Monday after the election with either proof of identity or an affidavit swearing the voter has not ID because of indigence or a religious objection to being photographed.”
The free ID cards are available to registered voters who have no other form of photo ID and will be 18 years old by the next election and have submitted a voter registration application.
The process to receive a free ID card is simple, according to Howard County Clerk Brenda Washburn, who said county clerks in every Arkansas county are now equipped with a camera and computer to produce the cards. The equipment was provided by the Arkansas Secretary of State’s office at no cost to the counties except the stock on which the cards are printed.
Voters will be required to fill out an application and “sign an oath, swearing you do not have any kind of photo identification. You must also provide certain information to the clerk: A photo or non-photo identity document including full legal name and date of birth; documentation of name and residential address; and evidence of registration or proof of application to register to vote.”
“Proof of identity” documents are items such as birth certificates, marriage licenses, notarized state and federal tax returns, pay stubs including imprinted name of the applicant’s employer, etc.
The ID card issued by the county will be in color and subjects must not “wear sunglasses, a hat, headgear or any other item that disguises or conceals your face.”
The voter ID card issued by counties cannot be used for general ID purposes and is “valid for the sole purpose of voter identification in an election.” The card will be valid as long as the voter lives in the same county where it was issued. If a voter moves out of the original county, the card must either be returned to the county clerk who issued the card or turned in to the county clerk at the new residence.
Act 595’s only exception for showing a photo ID to vote is for persons who live in a “long-term or residential care facility licensed by the state.” Those voters, however, do have to prove they are a resident of such a facility.
According to information published on Act 595, the acceptable photo ID’s to show before voting include:
  • Driver’s license
  • Photo ID card
  • Concealed handgun carry license
  • U.S. passport
  • State of federal government employee ID
  • U.S. military ID
  • Student ID card from an Arkansas institute
  • Public assistance ID card
In 2013, Democrat Governor Mike Beebe vetoed the Republican-sponsored Act 595 but the Senate voted to override the veto. Beebe said the act was “an expensive solution in search of a problem” and could unnecessarily infringe on voters’ rights.
The cost to implement the photo ID devices in each of the state’s 75 counties amounted to $114,974.

 

Search for direction leads to youth position at IBC

Brent Thompson

By Emily Alexander
Leader staff
For Brent Thompson, the start of a new year isn’t the only new thing in his life. He has recently become the father of a baby girl and on Oct. 20, officially started his new position as youth director at Immanuel Baptist Church of Nashville.
Thompson graduated from Greene County Tech High School in 2002 in Paragould. Then, he attended Ouachita Baptist University, where he graduated with a degree in Biology in 2006. Two years later he received a Master of Arts in Teaching.
“Since that time, I have been pursuing a Master of Divinity through Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary’s Little Rock Extension Center,” he said.
Thompson has worked a wide variety of jobs since the age of 16.
“I worked at a local grocery store in high school, then AutoZone while in college, and I drove a school bus for Arkadelphia Public Schools until I graduated from OBU,” Thompson said. “While attending HSU, I taught Physical Science in both the North Little Rock and Benton School Districts. In January 2010, I was called to pastor Dixsonville Baptist Church, a mission of First Baptist Church in Benton. My wife Ashley and I served there until being called to Immanuel.”
He met Ashley while at OBU shortly before she graduated. They married the following year. The couple has been married for seven and a half years, and has an eight-week-old baby, Lucy Kate.
Thompson said he believes playing any role in the ministry comes from a calling from God. He first started realizing his calling while working alongside the youth pastor at Third Baptist Church in Malvern one summer during college. A year and a half later, he said, his calling was made clear.
Up until now, however, his focus hasn’t been exclusively on youth. After he and his wife felt their time at Dixsonville was coming to an end, they began to seek where God would want him to pastor next. He began sending out resumes and praying in that direction.
“In July of 2013, I felt a strong conviction that I had been praying God into my neat little box because of what was ‘logically’ the next step. I shared this with Ashley and we began praying that the Lord would open our hearts and minds to where He would have us to serve next and in what capacity, regardless of whether or not it was what we expected,” Thompson said.
In August, the couple ran into a member of Immanuel’s Youth Pastor Search Committee at Walmart. He said that he had been thinking about them for the past few weeks and wanted to know if Thompson would consider sending in a resume for the youth pastor position.
Thompson said, “Ashley and I spent several weeks praying for God’s direction regarding this possibility, after which I had the opportunity to lead the youth group on several Sunday and Wednesday nights. Through the time I spent with the students as well as with members of the search committee, God made very clear to us that this ministry was what He had planned for us for this time in our life and the life of the church.”
Thompson is setting his goals around something he says he has found universal among teenagers regardless of age and grade level: students are hungry for truth.
“Truth about what it means to be saved, truth about how to live life, truth about what the Bible really says about issues that they are facing and will face in the coming years,” he said. “Therefore, I believe that it is imperative that we begin by laying a solid foundation with the only truth that matters—the truth found in God’s Word. It is my prayer that God will use me to teach and disciple these students in a way that fosters real spiritual growth and helps students grasp that having saving faith in Christ and living as a follower of Christ are much more than what they do on Sunday or Wednesday or at some weekend retreat. Through delving into the truth of God’s Word, students’ faith will become real and will be grounded, not in a great church program or a dynamic adult leader, but in the inerrant Word of God and the Gospel of His Son, Jesus Christ.”
Shortly after Thompson began at Immanuel, Michael Dyar took over the youth position at First Baptist Church of Nashville. The two, both science majors, were college roommates their freshman year at OBU.
Thompson said, “We had several classes together. Michael was one of those guys that you could count on for a friendly hello no matter where he was or who he was with. He had the ability to make anyone he was around feel valued and accepted. He was focused and determined in school, and I had and continue to have respect for him.”
The two plan on taking advantage of their relationship and both being placed in Nashville with youth groups at the same time.
“I am very excited about the plans God has for student ministry here in Nashville in the months and years ahead,” Thompson said. “Looking back over the events of the past few months — how both Michael and I have been brought to the same town to serve in the same position at two different churches — it is clear that this scenario could only be orchestrated and executed by God. I believe God is laying the groundwork for a great revival in and among students in Nashville, not because of Michael or me, but because of God working through us and others ministering in the area as we strive to make a kingdom difference in this community. I look forward to getting to partner with Michael on various events, enabling us to combine our resources and experience as God leads to carry out his work.”

 

Crash near Hope kills Murfreesboro man

A 44-year-old Murfreesboro man died in a one-vehicle accident in Hempstead County on Christmas Eve.
James Mark Russell was behind the wheel of a southbound 1995 Jeep on Highway 29 when he entered a curve “but continued going straight and struck several trees,” according to a preliminary Arkansas State Police report.
Trooper Darren Henley listed the weather and road conditions are “clear” and “dry” at the time of the accident. The accident was reported at 6:45 p.m. near Hempstead County Road 217, north of Hope.

Financial assistance available for Cottonshed Water Projects; applications periods set for Jan. 9, Jan. 16

Financial assistance is now available for low and moderate income citizens who would like to be hooked up to the Howard County-Cottonshed Water Project.
Applications will be taken on Jan. 9 at the Bright Star Baptist Church, 675 Bright Star Road in Mineral Springs, from 3:30 to 7 p.m. and Jan. 16 at the Cottonshed Fire Department, 211 Parker Drive in Mineral Springs, from 3:30 to 7 p.m.
Financial assistance covers running the water line from the master line to the home. It does not pay for the costs of the average monthly bill.
Howard County and Southwest Arkansas Water System is able to offer these benefits because of a grant received from the Arkansas Economic Development Commission-Arkansas Natural Resources Commission in order to assist with hookups for households that might qualify as being low to moderate income.
Only water system users who are currently signed up to receive water are eligible for this assistance.
Applications can also be obtained from Debbie Harbour with Southwest Arkansas Planning Development District, (870) 235-7518.
The following are the income limits for Howard County. These numbers are considered to be the standard in determining which households are considered to be low to moderate income and ultimately who will receive the benefits for free hookups.
Number of Household Occupants (NHO): 1
Gross Annual Income (GAI): $24,650
NHO: 2
GAI: $28,200
NHO: 3
GAI: $31,700
NHO: 4
GAI: $35,200
NHO: 5
GAI: $38,050
NHO: 6
GAI: $40,850
NHO: 7
GAI: $43,650
NHO: 8
GAI: $46,500

Nashville parks department takes over rental management for two facilities

The Nashville Parks and Recreation Department has taken over management of rentals for the Carter Day Training Center and the former American Legion ‘Hut’.
The change takes place beginning Wednesday, January 1.
To reserve the use of either facility, contact the Nashville City Park office at (870) 845-7405 Monday-Friday 8-4:30.
The Nashville Parks and Recreation office also rents other facilities for meetings and gatherings, including rooms or facilities at the city park — the Green Room, stage, and three outdoor pavilions.

Building permits issued for 8 residences in 2013

There were eight new Nashville residential building permits issued in 2013, and the units had a combined valuation of $800,000.
The largest building project begun in the city of Nashville was for a medical office building owned by the Howard Memorial Hospital Foundation, and located at 119 Medical Circle on the hospital campus. Its valuation was put at $669,640 according to records kept at city hall.
Five of the new residences were “WACD” — financed through USDA Rural Development, and the funds are administered by West Arkansas Community Development located in Nashville. John Stinnett, president of the agency, said that WACD had built six more homes in the trade area but outside the city limits of Nashville.
One late building permit issued in Nashville was for a new church for Life Tabernacle. The construction site is on a hilltop on Highway 27 N., and the valuation of the building was put at $559,000.
Residential building permits issued by the city included (owner, location, valuation):
February
Sally Luna; 110 Carter Loop; $80,000.
March
Jerry McCammack; 1667 Collins Road; $95,000.
Bobby Rockenbach; 1697 Collins Road; $60,000.
April
Randy Sain; 118 Carter Loop; $80,000.
May
Cedric Hopson; 512 S. Mill; $80,000.
Ellen Ward; 110 Ridgeway Drive; $85,000.
June
Beatriz Taylor; 106 Carter Loop; $80,000
November
Tim Frohnappel; 188 Catherine Lane; $80,000.
The city also issued 11 permits for residential remodeling or addition projects.
A large project recently completed was the $1 million-plus Scrapper Arena at Nashville High School which got its permit in 2012.

 

Nashville basketball continues with tournaments

The Scrappers and Scrapperettes will participate in tournaments this week and next.
The Scrappers are competing in the Dual State Tournament at Junction City. They played Camden Harmony Grove Tuesday after the Leader went to press. The tournament continues through the week, with the finals set for Saturday, Jan. 4, at 7:30 p.m. Other teams include Crossett, Bearden, Junction City, Norphlet, Lafayette County, Gurdon and Emerson.
The Scrapperettes will play in the Cossatot River Senior Tournament starting Monday, Jan. 6, at 7 p.m They will play the winner of a Jan. 4 game between Cossatot River and Horatio. The finals are set for Saturday, Jan. 11, at 6 p.m.
Other teams include De Queen, Umpire, Mt. Ida, Oden, Acorn, Dierks, Caddo Hills and Foreman.
Conference play will resume Tuesday, Jan. 7 when both teams host Central Arkansas Christian. They will travel to Arkadelphia Friday, Jan. 10.

NHS cheerleaders reflect on Class 4A crown

STATE CHAMPIONS. The Scrapper cheerleaders display their trophy and banner after winning the state Class 4A championship Dec. 21 at the Hot Springs Convention Center.

By Jana Copeland
Leader staff
“Unlike football, basketball, softball, and really all other sports, we have no way of scouting our competition. We have to just be prepared to bring our best and hope that the other squads can’t match us! We had 2 1/2 minutes to prove we were the best- and we did just that!” said Susan Renfrow, Nashville cheer coach, after winning the state Class 4A championship Dec. 21. “There are so many factors that go into winning a state championship in cheering now. In 2008, AAA changed the score sheet completely. Before that scoring used to be about perfection of motions, jumps, stunts and dance. Now it’s all that but even more about crowd performance and tricky stunts.”
After the squad learned the routine in August, Renfrow was “determined to incorporate as much as possible into our Friday night band dances to help the girls get used to the new skills in front of a crowd as well as having that as good practice. One of the stunts that we did every Friday that was also in competition was a full up to an extension. To my knowledge out of 70 squads that performed at state, we were one of four that performed that skill all day, and I guess it paid off.
“While I am the girls’ biggest critic, I am also their biggest fan. While we had good jumps, tumbling, motions, and stunts, I knew to win a state championship we had to perfect all of those skills to compete with the best,” Renfrow said.
Every year the same five or six squads seem to make up the top half at state, but no one dominates every year. “While we have always been in the top, third place is the best we had placed. This year I knew we had a pretty good shot at winning because of the talent we had along with a great group of seniors to lead us. This was also the first year since I have been coaching that we had no night practice sessions leading up to state because the girls were so ready,” Renfrow said.
“The day of state we didn’t even warm up the whole routine; they knew where to be and what to do. Instead we ran through the stunts and pyramid; they warmed up their tumbling, and we were ready to go. I could feel the excitement they had right before they performed. They were so ready to get out this routine out there and into the judges’ hands. With the exception of one stunt being a little shaky, the girls performed beautifully,“ Renfrow said. “I tried not to get too excited and set myself up for disappointment because Valley View had already performed a great routine and then we watched Pottsville perform a good routine as well.”
Finally, after a 2 1/2 hour wait while all the other squads performed, the time came to find out who won. The announcer said the 4A runner-up was Valley View, but “I still wasn’t sure that we had won,” Renfrow said. “It doesn’t take but one major deduction that we might not even know we made to knock our score down really fast. Then they called Nashville as the 4A state champions! I’m pretty sure my mouth just dropped and I grabbed my face. I was so proud and excited for the girls and their parents. As happy as I am that it’s over and we won, I am already thinking about next year and how we can start getting ready.”
Afterward, the girls were excited about their title.
Kaden Peebles said, “I was very excited to perform and compete at state. We had been preparing for months and in the end it was worth it. We each did our part and worked together as a team. I love each of the girls like sisters. It was a great experience and I’m very proud of my team!’
Brittany Backus said, “During the competition it was a lot of fun because we were doing what we love to do for the last time of the season. When we won it was a huge dream; it was awesome that we had put so much effort into it and it had really paid off!”
Sadie Prejean was “very overwhelmed. Also I was extremely happy not just for me but also for my teammates and Mrs. Renfrow. I was excited about winning and getting rings!”
Alexus White said, “All I could think about during the competition was giving 110%! We had to give it our all and amaze the crowd and judges! After we won, all I could think was we just proved to people that Scrappers are the best!”
Taylor Spigner said was “more nervous waiting to hear the results than I was performing. I was squeezing Kailee Stinnett’s hand so hard, and they announced we won and I jumped and screamed and cried, I had never been so happy! I was so excited I didn’t even hear any more results after that! It was an amazing experience, one I will never forget!”
Stinnett was “unbelievably happy that we won. I couldn’t believe they actually called our name. I still smile and can’t contain my excitement every time I think about it!
Brooke Bowden said, “I was very excited for our squad. It was a goal we all wanted to achieve. Our hard work paid off and we enjoyed representing our Nashville Scrappers!”
Abby Herzog said she was really nervous before state, “But I was also confident because I knew we had all worked so hard and all we had to do was go out and do our best. I was so excited that we had won and the fact that I’m a senior and we hadn’t won in the past two years made it that much more special!”
Emily Herzog said, “It was great to see how happy all of my squad members were. We all wanted it so badly, and it was so great to see the happiness of us accomplishing our dreams!”
Avery Kesterson was “really pumped for state and, I think we all just had a pretty good feeling about it. We had worked so hard for that day, for that last 2 minutes and 30 seconds.”
For Kathleen Lance, “Winning state in cheerleading is a goal I’ve wanted to accomplish ever since my first year competing. At state it’s different than any other sport. In cheer you go out on the mats in front of the judges and you have 2 minutes and 30 seconds to either win state or come home with nothing! The day we won was so nerve racking and then so exciting after we found out we won!”
Jana Copeland said, “We worked so hard all year long to prove to a panel of judges that we deserved to win. I was so happy when I heard Nashville called as the state champions in 4A. My head was spinning after we were handed the trophy and I literally almost fell down because I was so excited. I am so thankful for my teammates, coach, and family for believing in us and helping us achieve our ultimate goal of winning state my senior year. I am incredibly grateful to God for allowing my teammates and me to showcase the abilities he has given us.”

Obituaries

Mac Carlton
Mac Carlton, Outdoors Man, died Tuesday, Dec. 24, 2013 at his home.
He was born Oct. 14, 1963 in Nashville, Ark., to the late Noel D. “Chuck” Carlton and Ruby Brandon Carlton.
Mac was a member of the First Baptist Church. He was a great brother and uncle. He loved the outdoors and the simple things in life. Mac never met a stranger and would do anything for his family and friends. Mac was self-employed in produce sales with growing, buying, and retail sales, and had been an independent wholesale distributor for Kellogg. He was a Master Wood Turner, member of Southeast Oklahoma Wood Turners and Ark-La-Tex Wood Turners in Texarkana.
Mac proudly participated and won honors in the Wood Turners competition at the Oklahoma Forest Heritage Center at Beavers Bend State Park in Oklahoma. The Wood Turners made and donated wood boxes to the “Beads of Courage Program.” This program gives children with a life-threatening illness a glass bead as they move through each different part of their medical journey. A child could receive as many as a thousand beads. The wooden boxes will hold the children’s glass beads.
He was preceded in death by his parents, Noel D. and Ruby Brandon Carlton; maternal grandparents, Hannie Brandon and Ella Jester Brandon, and paternal grandparents, Joe C. Carlton and Holly Grisham Carlton.
Mac is survived by his brother, Joe Don and Wife, Laura Carlton, of Nashville; nephew, Michael Carlton of Texarkana, Texas; one niece, Dana Carlton of Nashville; and one great nephew, Jayden of Nashville and a host of other family and friends.
Graveside service will be at 10 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 4, 2014 at the Ozan Cemetery (Bingen) near Nashville.
Visitation will be at the cemetery.
Donations may be made to the Ozan Cemetery; c/o Jay Lathrop, 190 Hempstead 27N, Nashville, AR  71852.
You may send an online sympathy message to http://www.latimerfuneralhome.com/.
James ‘Mark’ Russell
James ‘Mark’ Russell, 44, of Murfreesboro, died Tuesday, Dec. 24, 2013, at Hope.
He was born April, 11, 1969 in Hope, to Charles and Carolyn Sanders Russell.
He was a member of Garrett Memorial Baptist Church in Hope, and was in the Arkansas National Guard.
He was preceded in death by a step-son, Daniel Stone.
Survivors include: his wife of 10 years, Selina Womack Russell, of Murfreesboro; a step-son, Dusty Stone, of Murfreesboro; step-daughter, Courtney Stone; brothers Phillip Russell and Willie Russell, both of Hope; his parents; and grandchildren.
Visitation was 6-8 p.m. Friday, Dec. 27, 2013, at Brazzel/Oakcrest Funeral Home in Hope.
Graveside service was 11 a.m., Saturday, Dec. 28, 2013, at Foster Cemetery, in Springhill, Ark., with Bro. Clif Johnson and Bro. Steve Kelley officiating; arrangements by Brazzel/Oakcrest Funeral Home of Hope.
William Randall Jamison
William Randall ‘Randy’ Jamison, 61, of Nashville, died Tuesday, Dec. 24. 2013 in Little Rock.
He was born Nov. 27, 1952 in Nashville, the son of Eileen Thompson Jamison and the late Billy Flemister Jamison.
He was a member of the Sunset Church of Christ and was a U.S. Navy veteran of Vietnam.
He was preceded in death by a sister, Caroline Jamison.
Survivors include: a son, Andrew Jamison of Texarkana; a daughter, Lauren Jamison of Texarkana; his mother, Eileen Thompson Jamison of Nashville; a brother, John Paul Jamison of Ft. Smith; three sisters, Candace Jamison, Susan Pounds, and Becky Hosey of Nashville.
Services were on Saturday, Dec. 29, 2013 at 2 p.m. at the Latimer Funeral Home Chapel, in Nashville with Bro. David Williams and Bro. Randy Hughes officiating. Burial followed in Mt. Pleasant Cemetery in Nashville under the direction of Latimer Funeral Home, Nashville.
Visitation was Friday, Dec. 27, 2013 from 6-8 p.m. at the funeral home chapel in Nashville.
Online at latimerfuneralhome.com.
Brenda Kathleen Linzy
Brenda Kathleen Linzy, 61, of Murfreesboro, died Wednesday, Dec. 25, 2013 in Murfreesboro.
She was born Nov. 19, 1952 in Anderson, Ind., the daughter of the late Thomas Ray Franklin and Ida Mae Knighten Franklin.
She was a member of the First Baptist Church in Murfreesboro.
She was preceded in death by a brother, Tommy Franklin.
Survivors include: her husband, Jerry Linzy of Murfreesboro; four daughters, Whitney Kathleen Linzy of Murfreesboro, Tracy Suzanne Cortez and husband, Ernie, of Houston, Sherri Mae Wilkerson and husband, Heath, of Murfreesboro, and Christy Ann Peek of Murfreesboro; a brother, Billy Franklin and wife, Diane, of Pocola, Okla.; one sister, Patricia Ann Tolbert of Ft. Smith; also grandchildren.
Services were Sunday, Dec. 29, 2013 at 1 p.m. at the Latimer Funeral Home Chapel, Murfreesboro, with Bro. Al Terrell officiating. Burial followed in Roy Cemetery in Murfreesboro under the direction of Latimer Funeral Home.
Visitation was on Saturday, Dec. 28, from 6-8 p.m. in Murfreesboro.
Online at latimerfuneralhome.com.
MJ Copeland
MJ Copeland, 78, resident of Willow Creek, Texas, passed away, Wednesday, Dec. 25th at his home, peacefully in his sleep.
MJ was born in Nashville, Ark., August 21st, 1934, the son of  William and Florence McClure Copeland. MJ was married to the late Sue Copeland for a devoted 44 years.
MJ spent his career working with ABF trucking for 31 years. He loved spending time with friends and loved ones, reminiscing over the years spent in the Navy, as well as his years growing up in Nashville, playing football for the Scrappers.
MJ was survived by his son, Mike Copeland and daughter, Threresia Trahan and her husband, Steve Trahan, of Rowlett Texas.
MJ was preceded in death by his sister, Eddie Copeland, and is survived by two brothers, Wayne and William Copeland, and three sisters, Deronda Godfrey, Ruthie Barns, and Dorthy Capps.
MJ has three granddaughters, Britny McKenzie, Cortney Copeland and Casey Copeland; one grandson, Blake Trahan, and two great-grandsons, Austin Fernandez and Ryder McKenzie.
The family received friends at the funeral home Saturday night for visitations from 6-8.
Graveside services were Sunday, Dec. 29th, 2013 at 3 p.m. at Restland Memorial Park in Nashville. Arrangements were under the direction of Nashville Funeral Home.
A.J. Miller
A.J. Miller of Lancaster, Texas, was born in 1920 in Nathan, Ark., and peacefully graduated into Heaven on Dec. 13, 2013, after a brief illness.
He was welcomed home by his Lord and Savior Jesus Christ, a host of angels, and his soul-mate and wife of 39 years, Mary Ann Wakeland Miller; parents Ruth Waters Miller and John Fletcher Miller; brother, J.F. Miller; sister, Lutheria Tackett and her husband, John Tackett; and many others.
He will be loved and missed by his two daughters, Emily Miller, and Sandra Resch and her husband, Franz, and son, John Miller and his wife, Cuc; sister, Loretta Linskie; nine grandchildren, Thomas Eppes, Elissa Conti, Melissa Gentry, Angela Coppock, Arlon Miller, Regina Miller, Timothy Martin, Wilma Jean Green and their respective spouses; 18 great-grandchildren; brother & sisters-in-love Max Wakeland, Nadine Wakeland, Argie Wynn; nephews, John Tackett, and Max Tackett and his wife, Deb; Jimmy Miller, J.R. Miller and numerous other relatives and those who knew him.
During his full, healthy 93 years, he owned and drove his own truck before and after
serving in the Air Force in World War II, and later owned A. J. Miller Trucking Co.
He loved his family, friends and animals, especially horses. He and his wife Mary owned and operated Windy Acres Arabians, raising beautiful, prize-winning horses.
He was a long-time member of Desoto First United Methodist Church and the DeSoto Masonic Lodge.
In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to Life Outreach, P.O. Box 982000, Ft. Worth, Texas 76182.